Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMcGarity-Shipley, Michael
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-12T15:42:46Z
dc.date.available2019-11-12T15:42:46Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/27447
dc.description.abstractHumans have the remarkable ability to learn and perform motor skills, often involving the manipulation of different objects or tools, such as swinging a hammer or a tennis racket. The objects that we manipulate are usually associated with different dynamics, which determine the movement of an object as a result of the force applied. Skillful manipulation requires forming and recalling memories of these object dynamics. Although it has been assumed that such memories are linked to objects, per se, it was recently shown that people can form separate memories, for opposing dynamics, when these are linked to different locations, or ‘control points’, on an object (Heald, Ingram, Flanagan, & Wolpert, 2018). In the previous study, participants controlled the handle of a robotic device to move a virtual rectangular object with circles (control points) on the left and right sides. In different trials, they were instructed to move either the left or right control point to different targets. When these control points were paired with opposing force fields, adaptation was observed even though the required movement was constant, a situation that typically cannot be learned. In this previous study, both the controlled point and the target location changed between contexts. The aim of the current study was to assess whether one or both of these factors is critical for learning. The first experiment was similar to our previous study, except that the bar automatically rotated as it was moved forward such that the left and right control points, controlled in different contexts, moved to a common target. In the second experiment, the bar was aligned vertically with a single control point at the far end. Again, the bar rotated as it was moved forward such that the control point moved to a target located on either the left or right in different contexts. We found that, in both experiments, participants learned opposing force fields applied in the two contexts. We conclude that separate memories of dynamics can be formed for different ‘contact events’ involving a unique combination of the controlled point on the manipulated object and the target object this point contacts.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectMotor Controlen_US
dc.subjectSensorimotor Learningen_US
dc.subjectObject Manipulationen_US
dc.subjectMotor Memoryen_US
dc.subjectControl Pointsen_US
dc.titleMotor Memories in Manipulation Tasks are Linked to Contact Events Between Objectsen_US
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.supervisorFlanagan, Randall
dc.contributor.supervisorGallivan, Jason
dc.contributor.departmentNeuroscience Studiesen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record