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dc.contributor.authorDylan, Kaziwa Salihen
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-07T16:19:42Z
dc.date.available2020-02-07T16:19:42Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/27623
dc.description.abstractThis interdisciplinary study reconceptualizes the dominant vision of how genocides begin, and the role civilians play in both cultural and physical forms of genocide. I coined the term “genocide culture” and reconceptualize the terms “civilian actors” and “civilian actors and ethnic engineering” to present an alternative hypothesis of how civilians become involved in genocide through their participation in a range of cultural habitus and doxa. I argue that the socio-cultural aspects of a genocidal process develop prior to the murderous events of a state-led genocide. The concept of genocide culture draws attention to the cultural practices and core beliefs that make genocide possible. The concept highlights how a society normalizes violence against a targeted group, rationalizes the ideology of the dominant group, and legitimizes its authority. The term civilian actors describes the dispositions of ordinary people and non-state actors in the reproduction of cultural practices and behaviours that foster the state’s genocidal actions. Finally, reconceptualization of the term ethnic engineering is to include the “reconstruction” and “destruction” of a subjected group’s identity by a dominant group. The dissertation applies the sociological theories of Pierre Bourdieu to the study of genocide in order to develop socio-cultural discourses concerning genocide culture. The history of genocide against the Kurds in Iraq is examined as a case study. While Saddam Hussein and the Ba’ath Party are often invoked when responsibility for late twentieth-century genocides in Iraq is assigned, this dissertation argues against personalizing or individualizing the history of genocide in Iraq by assigning responsibility to a single agent or a single political organization. Thus, it avoids detaching the present from the past and argues that macro-events in the present are accumulations of the micro-processes of past events, which also cannot be disassociated from civilians. The first part of the dissertation outlines the theoretical apparatus that is used to conceptualize the cultural practices of the general population in Iraq prior to Saddam Hussein’s rule. The second part consists of empirical case studies and analysis of semi-structured interviews that were conducted to contextualize the experiences of individuals.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectGenocide Cultureen
dc.subjectKurden
dc.subjectIraqen
dc.subjectDoxaen
dc.subjectHabitusen
dc.subjectCultural Theoryen
dc.subjectGenocideen
dc.subjectPierre Bourdieuen
dc.subjectSocial Patternsen
dc.subjectEthnic Violenceen
dc.subjectClassificationen
dc.subjectBa'athificationen
dc.subjectNationalismen
dc.titleGenocide Culture: From Everyday Cultural Doxa and Ethnic Engineering to Genocide of Kurds in Iraqen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreePhDen
dc.contributor.supervisorScott, Jillen
dc.contributor.supervisorWoolford, Andrewen
dc.contributor.departmentCultural Studiesen
dc.embargo.termsI would like to turn my thesis into a book and I want to restrict the results of this study to the public until I have published a manuscripten
dc.embargo.liftdate2025-02-06T21:43:34Z
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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