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dc.contributor.authorBabando, Jordanen
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-16T17:56:06Z
dc.date.available2020-04-16T17:56:06Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/27708
dc.description.abstractTypically, medical training does not prepare healthcare workers to deal with emotions in medical practice, which can cause them to shut down emotionally and withdraw from patients as a way of protecting themselves. Recent work demonstrates how emotions play an essential role in healthcare relations and patient care delivery and, as such, call for greater attention in sociological research. The primary aim of this exploratory research was to uncover and understand the emotional, social interactions of healthcare workers in a Canadian hospital context. The findings of this study come from a combination of ethnographic field research and 28 in-depth interviews with various healthcare professionals within one Canadian hospital. A principal finding is an expectation for healthcare workers to follow “feeling rules,” which are socialized through a hidden curriculum and specific ward cultures. The main cause of sadness at work comes from what is commonly known as a “bad death,” while anger mainly emanates from poor interactions and relationships with colleagues. Participants report that interactions with colleagues are the primary source of happiness, along with recognition from their patients (the chief source of happiness and accomplishment). The encouragement to suppress emotions in the workplace and the lack of recognition and support for emotional distress from hospital management had a negative effect on the personal lives of healthcare staff. The workplace expectations for healthcare workers to hide their negative emotions render such experiences invisible, and further leave staff to deal with such emotions alone. These findings are important for understanding how to effectively prepare healthcare workers to recognize and process emotions encountered in medical practice, and to make negative emotional experiences visible.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectsociology of emotionsen
dc.subjectlabour studiesen
dc.subjectethnographyen
dc.subjectqualitativeen
dc.subjectemotional labouren
dc.subjectmedical sociologyen
dc.subjectemotionsen
dc.subjectsociologyen
dc.titleThe Sociology of Emotions in Medical Practice: An Ethnographic Case Study of Health Care Interactionsen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreePhDen
dc.contributor.supervisorBurfoot, Annette
dc.contributor.departmentSociologyen
dc.embargo.termsI wish to restrict the thesis for the time being due to a book proposal I am submitting for publication. Since the majority of the book will be based on my dissertation, I am concerned that the publication of the book might interfere with the copyright. My supervisor is aware.en
dc.embargo.liftdate2025-04-16T16:35:14Z
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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