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dc.contributor.authorAndrew, Kevinen
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-25T20:25:13Z
dc.date.available2020-09-25T20:25:13Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/28145
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation investigates the life cycle dynamics of US firms. In Chapter 2, I summarize a set of recent trends which I refer to as the ``Decline in US Business Dynamism". I then build and calibrate a model of firm dynamics which includes each of these measures of business dynamism as endogenous outcomes. I use this model to examine several potential causes for the trends in question. In particular, I examine demographic changes, increases in firm market power and changes in fixed, entry and adjustment costs. I argue that none of the proposed explanations can account for the entire set of facts in on their own. Chapter 3 of the dissertation introduces a dataset of publicly listed American firms. I use these data to explore relationships between firm age, firm growth, R&D spending and patenting. I find that, conditional on firm size, mature firms conduct less R&D and take out more patents. However, the patents that mature firms take out are less valuable where the value of a patent is measured both by citations and changes in the market value of the firm. I then introduce a simple model of firm dynamics and R&D spending to frame the results Lastly, in Chapter 4 I use a production function estimation approach to analyze the relationship between productivity, firm age and \rd intensity. These estimates can be used in a wide variety of quantitative applications. This is because the empirical method that I develop relies on a minimal set of assumptions. I find that revenue productivity, is positively related to firm size and age. I also find evidence of a non-linear relationship between R&D intensity and productivity. The marginal effect of R&D intensity on productivity is higher for more productive firms. Another emphasis of this chapter is on the uncertainty of the R&D process. I find that realizations of the volatility of future productivity are positively related to \rd intensity and negatively related to firm age since listing.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectEconomicsen
dc.subjectInnovationen
dc.subjectBusiness Dynamismen
dc.subjectThe Firm Life Cycleen
dc.subjectFirm Dynamicsen
dc.titleEssays on US Business Dynamicsen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreePhDen
dc.contributor.supervisorHead, Allen
dc.contributor.supervisorCozzi, Marco
dc.contributor.supervisorLloyd-Ellis, Huw
dc.contributor.departmentEconomicsen
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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Queen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canada
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Queen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canada