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dc.contributor.authorClegg, Kayleigh-Ann
dc.contributor.authorMoskowitz, D. S.
dc.contributor.authorMiners, Christopher T. H.
dc.contributor.authorAndrevski, Goce
dc.contributor.authorSadikaj, Gentiana
dc.contributor.authorZuroff, David C.
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-16T21:03:38Z
dc.date.available2020-10-16T21:03:38Z
dc.date.issued2020-09-25
dc.identifier.citationClegg, K., Moskowitz, D. S., Miners, C. T. H., Andrevski, G., Sadikaj, G., & Zuroff, D. C. (2020). Interpersonal perception and interpersonal spin. Journal of Personality. doi:10.1111/jopy.12594en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/28209
dc.description.abstractIntroduction Interpersonal spin is an indicator of intraindividual variability in social behavior. Spin is positively related to Neuroticism and is maladaptive, with well-documented deleterious effects on social functioning. The perceptual processes associated with spin and how spin emerges are less well-understood. The present research examines the interpersonal perception of individuals with higher spin and tests whether these perceptual processes explain the association of spin with Neuroticism. Method 267 students participated in a 20-day event contingent recording procedure, reporting on social interactions via mobile application. Participants' perceptions of others' behavior, their own affect, and their own behavior were measured within and across interactions. Results We examined the affective and behavioral responses of individuals with higher spin to perceptions of others' behaviors. Individuals with higher spin showed greater affective and behavioral reactivity to perceptions of others' communal (agreeable-quarrelsome) behavior. Neuroticism predicted greater affective reactivity (i.e., steeper slopes between event-level perceived communion and negative affect), which in turn predicted higher spin. Conclusions Individuals with higher spin may have an interpersonal style characterized by greater reactivity to perceptions of others' communal behavior. These individuals' behavioral lability may reflect underlying emotional dysregulation. These processes may ultimately interfere with the formation and maintenance of social bonds.en
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.rightsThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Clegg, K., Moskowitz, D. S., Miners, C. T. H., Andrevski, G., Sadikaj, G., & Zuroff, D. C. (2020). Interpersonal perception and interpersonal spin. Journal of Personality. doi:10.1111/jopy.12594, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jopy.12594. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.en
dc.subjectinterpersonal perceptionen
dc.subjectinterpersonal spinen
dc.subjectNeuroticismen
dc.subjectreactivityen
dc.titleInterpersonal perception and interpersonal spinen
dc.typejournal articleen
dc.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jopy.12594
project.funder.identifier10.13039/501100000155
project.funder.nameSocial Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canadaen
oaire.awardNumber435‐ 2013‐0104


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