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dc.contributor.authorAl Jelban, Hebatulrahmanen
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-19T18:10:40Z
dc.date.available2020-10-19T18:10:40Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/28213
dc.description.abstractDisasters across the globe occurring with increasing frequency and devastation require an immediate response to mitigate social and economic upheaval. Nursing plays a key role in disaster management from beginning to end: prevention, preparedness, response, and recovery. Unfortunately, nurses are unprepared to manage disasters, mainly due to a lack of knowledge and experience. Although nursing literature recommends incorporating disaster nursing (DN) education into international undergraduate nursing curricula, few studies discuss how to implement such curricula; and worse, I found no studies based in Canada even though Canadian nursing regulatory bodies require competence in DN of entry-level nurses . My study aimed to explore nursing educators’ experiences of teaching DN to help me understand what, when, and how nurse educators teach this important subject. Understanding the current practice of teaching DN helps to improve existing teaching methodologies and produce a more prepared nursing workforce. Using a qualitative narrative inquiry mainly guided by Clandinin and Connelly (2000), my research study includes the stories of two nurse educators who shared their unique experiences of teaching DN in Canadian nursing schools. Participants were interviewed twice, and data was analyzed using the three-dimensional narrative inquiry space of time, sociality, and place. While the findings of this study are consistent with the literature that DN education is taught in the community health course, findings also point to its inclusion in the context of the medical surgical course. This study also highlighted how nurse educators teach DN in Ontario, Canada, and key challenges they encounter including lack of DN knowledge, time, and teaching resources. One surprising interpretation of the narratives was the limit of educators’ knowledge and how their experience may restrict their awareness of the need to expand their DN knowledge and expertise.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.rightsAttribution-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectTeaching Disaster Nursingen
dc.subjectnurse educatorsen
dc.subjectdisaster nursingen
dc.titleA NARRATIVE APPROACH TO UNDERSTANDING NURSE EDUCATORS’ EXPERIENCES OF TEACHING DISASTER NURSING TO UNDERGRADUATE NURSING STUDENTS IN ONTARIOen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeMNSc.en
dc.contributor.supervisorTregunno, Deborah
dc.contributor.departmentNursingen
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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Queen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canada
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Queen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canada