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dc.contributor.authorDool, Kacey
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T20:22:46Z
dc.date.available2020-11-17T20:22:46Z
dc.date.issued2018-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/28596
dc.descriptionMaster's Research Essay (MRE) in partial fulfillment of the degree Master of Arts in the School of Religion at Queen's University.en
dc.description.abstractThis paper presents a critical analysis of the ‘Other’ as a mechanism of hegemonic Eurocentric colonialism. ‘Othering’ as a methodological lens allows for consideration of the complexities of identity politics, in an interdisciplinary manner. Through this interdisciplinary approach, a re-telling and re-consideration of the position of Indigenous Peoples in Canada is possible, engaging in a process of decolonization through ‘resurgent recognition’. The disproportionate gendered-violence perpetrated against Indigenous women and girls in the Canadian context acts as an example of the extent to which the prescription of the ‘Otherness’ distorts power relations: not only does the ‘colonial imagination’ situate the West and European settlement as ‘civilized’, and the Indigenous as ‘savage’, but it also inscribes a heteropatriarichal hierarchy. Through the representational art of Kent Monkman, ‘resurgent recognition’ provides public audiences, Indigenous and non-Indigenous alike, with the opportunity to reflect and reconsider the past 150 years of colonialism in Canada.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectIndigenous Studiesen
dc.subjectOtheringen
dc.subjectKent Monkmanen
dc.subjectResurgent Recognitionen
dc.subjectMaterial and Visual Cultureen
dc.subjectGendered Violenceen
dc.titlePainting You, Painting Me: Viewing the 'Other' through Gendered-Violence against Indigenous Women and Girls in Kent Monkman's "Shame and Prejudice: A Story of Resilience"en
dc.typeotheren


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