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dc.contributor.authorGhimire, Biduren
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-04T20:49:41Z
dc.date.available2021-01-04T20:49:41Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/28644
dc.description.abstractDigital microfluidics (DMF) is an emerging liquid-handling technology that enables the manipulation of small, discrete droplets (picoliters to microliters) in a precise and reproducible manner. The important applications of DMF involve droplet dispensing, moving, splitting and mixing contents within a droplet. Superhydrophobic (SH) surfaces are used in DMF for facilitating magnetic actuation of droplets and formation of microarrays. A surface is considered superhydrophobic if a water droplet displays both a water contact angle (θCA) >150◦, and a sliding angle (SA) <10◦. SH surfaces provide low frictional forces between a liquid droplet and the surface itself allowing for actuation using minimal force. Magnetic actuation uses an external magnetic field to manipulate droplets containing magnetisable particles (MPs). This thesis focuses on the actuation of organic and aqueous droplets on patterned (Super) hydrophobic surfaces. Different commercial coatings used in this study are Ultra-Ever Dry™, Never wet™ and Aculon®. Different surfaces can be patterned to higher surface energy patches called surface energy traps (SETs). Droplets can be pinned to the SETs and dewetted from the SETs. We utilize the contrasting behavior of patterned surfaces to quantitatively determine the ethanol in beer samples. The application of functionalized superparamagnetic particles (PMPs) in combination with magnetic separation techniques has been used for the fractionation of complex proteolytic digest of lysozyme. Droplet kinematic parameters are explored (e.g., volume, size of the SETs, particle concentrations, etc.). Furthermore, we utilize the patterned omniphobic surface Aculon® in combination with the magnetic actuation technique to extract a peptide (bradykinin) from artificial saliva. The fifth chapter of the thesis demonstrates the proof of principle of liquid chromatography (LC) archiving using high-density microarrays (HDMs) platform.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectDigital Microfluidicsen
dc.subjectSuperhydrophobic Surfaceen
dc.subjectSliding Angleen
dc.subjectSample Fractionationen
dc.subjectSuperparamagnetic particles (PMPs)en
dc.subject3D Printingen
dc.subjectLC-Archivingen
dc.subjectHDMsen
dc.titleUSE OF PATTERNED (SUPER) HYDROPHOBIC SURFACES IN SAMPLE PREPARATIONen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreePhDen
dc.contributor.supervisorOleschuk, Richard
dc.contributor.departmentChemistryen
dc.embargo.termsFinishing a couple of manuscripts for publication.en
dc.embargo.liftdate2021-01-04
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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