Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLauzon, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-07T15:21:06Z
dc.date.available2021-05-07T15:21:06Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/28835
dc.description.abstractEnrollment in higher educational institutions (HEI) has been steadily increasing across Canada, while on-campus accommodation provided by the HEI has plateaued. As a result, a majority of upper-year students now turn towards near-campus neighbourhoods for accommodation, displacing many long-term residents and occupying many low-income units. This process, by which residential neighbourhoods become dominated by student occupation, is known as studentification. Surprisingly, municipalities and HEIs collect little information about the locations of student dwellings. Fortunately, the Canadian Census does not clarify students living away from their parents’ home as occupants of a dwelling, so we can assume that “unoccupied” dwelling units near an HEI are filled with students. This report estimates unoccupied dwellings as potential student dwellings to provide a picture of the geographies of studentification in eleven mid-sized university cites in Ontario.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectStudenten
dc.subjectUrban Planningen
dc.subjectCanadaen
dc.subjectGISen
dc.subjectSpatial Analysisen
dc.subjectStudentificationen
dc.titleWHERE DID THE NEIGHBOURHOOD GO? A LOOK INTO THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF STUDENTS ACROSS ONTARIO MID-SIZED CITIESen
dc.typethesisen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record