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dc.contributor.authorSharma, Sarahen
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-25T19:39:47Z
dc.date.available2021-10-25T19:39:47Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/29519
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines climate resilience policies as a form of flood control in two cities: Amsterdam, the Netherlands and Dhaka, Bangladesh. I situate my examination of resilience within the subnational, national and supranational dynamics of global capitalism and climate change governance that have unfolded since the ascendency of neoliberalism (mid-1970s) until 2020. By undertaking the first transnational study of climate resilience across the traditionally ontologically and epistemologically divided global North and global South, I develop a relational International Political Economy and Environment (IPEE) framework to understand how climate resilience has emerged and is executed as the prominent policy approach to urban flood control in these distinct cities. A relational IPEE approach understands all spaces to be situated in relation to one another in global capitalism, and as such interpretively draws comparisons and contrasts divergences across uneven locales, outlining the relations of power shaping historically and contextually driven everyday experiences. The dissertation format is article-based (otherwise known as the “Manuscript, Project, Portfolio” format), comprised of three independent substantive articles (Chapters Three to Five) that examine the historical, institutional, discursive and material facets of of climate resilience in Amsterdam and Dhaka. These three articles are flanked by introductory (Chapter One), literature review (Chapter Two) and concluding (Chapter Six) chapters. The relational IPEE framework I employ focuses its attention on the role of urban space in global capitalism that comes into tension with comprehensive climate action, and the subnational, national and supranational socio-economic relations of power at play in each of my cases. The two cases selected across the global North and global South divide contextually compare and contrast the patterns and divergences associated with climate resilience on the ground in cities that are disparately framed as “model” masters of water (Amsterdam) and underdeveloped “apprentices” requiring guidance and change (Dhaka). The content of my dissertation interrupts and interrogates the rhetorical discourse that enhancing resilience can support sustainable forms of urbanization and contributes a theoretically and empirically oriented analysis of the relations of power leading to the reality of uneven socio-spatial experiences with urban flooding across and within Amsterdam and Dhaka.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectglobal political economyen
dc.subjectinternational political economy and environmenten
dc.subjecturban floodingen
dc.subjectclimate changeen
dc.subjectglobal environmental governanceen
dc.subjectresilienceen
dc.subjectAmsterdamen
dc.subjectDhakaen
dc.subjectNetherlandsen
dc.subjectBangladeshen
dc.subjectneoliberal urbanismen
dc.subjectausterity urbanismen
dc.titleGoverning Urban Flooding in Global Capitalism: The Relational International Political Economy and Environment of Climate Resilience in Amsterdam, the Netherlands and Dhaka, Bangladeshen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreePhDen
dc.contributor.supervisorSoederberg, Susanne
dc.contributor.departmentPolitical Studiesen
dc.embargo.termsI wish to have this thesis restricted as there are components of the work in the publication pipeline and I wish to develop this work as a book manuscript. As an emerging scholar, this work is intellectual property that I feel that would benefit from further work and protection. Further, book publishers prefer this work to be embargoed. Thank you for your kind consideration.en
dc.embargo.liftdate2026-10-25T13:20:00Z
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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