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dc.contributor.authorZelenika, Ivanaen
dc.date2011-08-16 17:13:06.891
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-16T23:30:55Z
dc.date.available2016-08-14T08:00:04Z
dc.date.issued2011-08-16
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/6652
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Environmental Studies) -- Queen's University, 2011-08-16 17:13:06.891en
dc.description.abstractIt has been proposed that the field of appropriate technology (AT) - small-scale, energy efficient and low-cost solutions, can be of tremendous assistance in many of the sustainable development challenges, such as food and water security, health, shelter, education and work opportunities. Unfortunately, there has not yet been a significant uptake of AT by organizations, researchers, policy makers or the mainstream public working in the many areas of the development sector. Some of the biggest barriers to higher AT engagement include: 1) AT perceived as inferior or ‘poor persons technology’, 2) questions of technological robustness, design, fit and transferability, 3) funding, 4) institutional support, as well as 5) general barriers associated with tackling rural poverty. With the rise of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for online networking and knowledge sharing, the possibilities to tap into the collaborative open-access and open-source AT are growing, and so is the prospect for collective poverty reducing strategies, enhancement of entrepreneurship, communications, education and a diffusion of life-changing technologies. In short, the same collaborative philosophy employed in the success of open source software can be applied to hardware design of technologies to improve sustainable development efforts worldwide. To analyze current barriers to open source appropriate technology (OSAT) and explore opportunities to overcome such obstacles, a series of interviews with researchers and organizations working in the field of AT were conducted. The results of the interviews confirmed the majority of literature identified barriers, but also revealed that the most pressing problem for organizations and researchers currently working in the field of AT is the need for much better communication and collaboration to share the knowledge and resources and work in partnership. In addition, interviews showcased general receptiveness to the principles of collaborative innovation and open source on the ground level. A much greater focus on networking, collaboration, demand-led innovation, community participation, and the inclusion of educational institutions through student involvement can be of significant help to build the necessary knowledge base, networks and the critical mass exposure for the growth of appropriate technology.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectOpen Sourceen
dc.subjectAppropriate Technologyen
dc.subjectSustainable Developmenten
dc.subjectKnowledge Commonsen
dc.titleBarriers and Solutions to Open Source Appropriate Technology for Sustainable Development: Innovation Through Collaborationen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.restricted-thesisI have submitted 2 papers that came from this thesis for journal consideration, I would like to place a hold on thesis web posting until I hear back.en
dc.description.degreeM.E.S.en
dc.contributor.supervisorPearce, Joshua M.en
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Studiesen
dc.embargo.terms1825en
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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