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dc.contributor.authorBylsma, Meganen
dc.date2011-12-20 17:29:24.88
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-21T16:51:55Z
dc.date.available2011-12-21T16:51:55Z
dc.date.issued2011-12-21
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/6916
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Art History) -- Queen's University, 2011-12-20 17:29:24.88en
dc.description.abstractThe Emma Lake Artists’ Workshops from the 1950s to the 1970s were a series of professional workshops held in northern Saskatchewan, under the auspices of the University of Saskatchewan and Regina College, for the creation and advancement of a dynamic arts culture in the province and as a way for the individual artists there to overcome feelings of isolation from the Canadian cultural hubs. Throughout the course of the Workshops provincial and federal attitudes, and cultural policies and perspectives on cultural nation building exerted an overarching influence in the shaping of the Workshops. The Workshops drew the attention and support of many established celebrity U.S. artists and it is due to their presence and influence at the Workshops that it is possible to examine the provincial and national response to perceived U.S. cultural imperialism. The founding and maturity of the Workshops is a case study of the ways in which the politics of Canadian nationalism and the effects of U.S. cultural imperialism in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries interacted to impact the growth and development of art communities across Canada. The Workshops serve as an example of the effects, on a regional art movement, of Canada’s relationship with the United States, and Canadian response to the perceived threat of cultural imperialism from the U.S. Because the Workshops were a microcosm of cultural production, involving artists who, aside from their participation at Emma Lake, were often fairly isolated from the ebb and flow of art currents inherent to larger cultural centers, the Workshops are also an important case study of the effects of national and provincial policy on the regional arts. The Workshops’ history reveals that ideas of nationalism, regionalism and continentalism can come together to have a profound and unique effect on the development of an art community.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectEmma Lake Artists' Workshopsen
dc.subjectRegina Fiveen
dc.subjectTed Godwinen
dc.subjectNationalismen
dc.subjectRonald Blooreen
dc.subjectDouglas Mortonen
dc.subjectMassey Commissionen
dc.subjectBarnett Newman in Canadaen
dc.subjectClement Greenberg in Canadaen
dc.subjectSaskatchewanen
dc.subjectArt Historyen
dc.subjectCultural Policyen
dc.subjectKenneth Lochheaden
dc.subjectArthur McKayen
dc.title"Betting on Saskatchewan" : Nationalism, Cultural Imperialism and the Emma Lake Artists’ Workshopsen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeM.A.en
dc.contributor.supervisorBrison, Jeffreyen
dc.contributor.supervisorJessup, Lyndaen
dc.contributor.departmentArt Historyen
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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