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dc.contributor.authorPahlevaninezhad, Majid
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2012-01-18 11:41:33.654en
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-18T17:57:35Z
dc.date.issued2012-01-18
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/6966
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D, Electrical & Computer Engineering) -- Queen's University, 2012-01-18 11:41:33.654en
dc.description.abstractThis thesis presents topologies and control methods to improve the efficiency and dynamic response of Electric Vehicle (EV) power converters. There are three main converters in an EV power conditioning system: a plug-in AC/DC converter, a low-voltage DC/DC converter, and a three-phase inverter. The focus of this thesis is to improve the plug-in AC/DC converter and the low-voltage DC/DC converter. A new topology is proposed to improve the efficiency and increase the reliability of the plug-in AC/DC converter. The plug-in AC/DC converter consists of a Power Factor Correction (PFC) stage, which is followed by a high voltage DC/DC converter for galvanic isolation. The proposed approach includes a simple and effective auxiliary circuit for the PFC stage, which guarantees soft-switching for the power switches. Next, a current-driven full-bridge topology is proposed for the high-voltage DC/DC conversion stage, which guarantees soft-switching and eliminates voltage spikes across the output diodes. Also, two control approaches are proposed in order to improve the dynamic response of the AC/DC converter. The first controller is based on nonlinear differential flatness theory, which can be used to improve the transient response of the AC/DC converter. The second controller is based on an optimized stabilizing control-Lyapunov function, which extends the stability margins and improves reliability. An optimized variable-frequency phase-shift controller is proposed for the low voltage DC/DC converter, which adaptively controls the amount of reactive current required to maintain soft-switching throughout the whole range of operation and minimizes the switching and conduction losses of the converter. Mathematical analysis, simulation, and experimental results are presented to verify the performance of the proposed techniques.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectElectrical Engineeringen_US
dc.subjectPower Electronicsen_US
dc.titlePower Converters for Electric Vehiclesen_US
dc.typethesisen_US
dc.description.restricted-thesisThere are some pending patent applications regarding this thesis.en
dc.description.degreePh.Den
dc.contributor.supervisorJain, Praveen K.en
dc.contributor.supervisorBakhshai, Alirezaen
dc.contributor.departmentElectrical and Computer Engineeringen
dc.embargo.terms1825en
dc.embargo.liftdate2017-01-16


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