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dc.contributor.authorMauro, Aaronen
dc.date2012-05-29 12:40:09.554
dc.date2012-05-31 10:01:52.902
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-31T23:43:19Z
dc.date.issued2012-05-31
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/7236
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D, English) -- Queen's University, 2012-05-31 10:01:52.902en
dc.description.abstractSince the attacks of September 11th, 2001, the literature of the United States has become increasingly concerned with telling tragic stories. While the literature written about the attacks is considerable and operates as the climax in this dissertation, the literature of the ensuing decade has been marked by a return to tragic terror more broadly. A distinct feeling of anxiety and fear continues to animate a strong tragic tradition in the contemporary novel. Through an analysis of motifs, figures, and metaphors derived from classical dramatic sources and the attendant philosophical tradition, this dissertation investigates the complex formal processes through which tragic American lives occur and their political contexts. This dissertation argues that American literary production in the first decade of the twenty-first century requires a critical return to the so-called Myth and Symbol School that inaugurated American Studies and established an American literary tradition with New England Transcendentalists. Emerson’s claim that America must be made great through and by its ability to perceive “the terror of life” resonates in today’s post-9/11 political and economic climate. This study illuminates the ways that the contemporary novelists have seen fit to incorporate classical tropes and narratives into traditional stereotypes of identity and nationhood. Linguistic life, it might be said, directly influences political life. Tragic America is an aggregation of tragic manifestations that finds political extensions and interpretive applications through provisional and figurative relationships. Relationships negotiated through this metaphoric sensibility are, I believe, the only honest means of comparison in our radically heterogeneous culture.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subject9/11en
dc.subjectPost-Nationalismen
dc.subjectEcologyen
dc.subjectEconomyen
dc.subjectDebten
dc.subjectTerrorismen
dc.subjectIdentityen
dc.subjectGenderen
dc.subjectIntersexualityen
dc.subjectAmerican Literatureen
dc.subjectIdeologyen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectNationalismen
dc.subjectAmerican Studiesen
dc.subjectVisual Cultureen
dc.subjectTragedyen
dc.titleTragic America: Terror, Metaphor, and the Contemporary American Novelen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.restricted-thesisI intend to publish this dissertation in a revised form as a monograph. Publishing this work to the web will greatly reduce my ability to publish this work. Publishing a monograph is critical to my progress and professionalization.en
dc.description.degreePhDen
dc.contributor.supervisorWallace, Mollyen
dc.contributor.departmentEnglishen
dc.embargo.terms1825en
dc.embargo.liftdate2017-05-30
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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