Now showing items 1-13 of 13

    • The Authority of Deontic Constraints 

      Ross, Andrew (2013-08-29)
      Non-consequentialists agree that Luke may not kill Lorelai in order to prevent Kirk from killing Richard and Emily. According to this view, Luke faces a deontic constraint: he is forbidden from killing Lorelai, even though ...
    • Between Virtue and Vice: Moral Worth for the Rest of Us 

      Doucet, Mathieu (2009-09-03)
      Most of us fall short of virtue—we are, at various times, weak-willed, selfish, self-absorbed, hypocritical, morally complacent, cowardly, and self-deceived. But most of us are not vicious, either. In this dissertation I ...
    • Intractable Difficulties for the Doctrine of Double Effect: The Problem of Closeness and the Proper Focus of Concern 

      Allan, Ian (2014-12-22)
      A more recent development within moral philosophy has been authors of a nonconsequentialist stripe forwarding arguments against principles once thought foundational to nonconsequentialist ethics as features that distinguished ...
    • Moral Liability to Self-Defense: Challenging Jeff McMahan's Fact-Relative Account 

      Jeffrey, Kory (2012-10-02)
      The focus of this thesis is the normative base of moral liability to defensive harm. Many argue that liability is what makes it morally permissible to seriously injure or kill in self-defense or in the defense of others. ...
    • Moral Responsibility and Preconditions of Moral Criticism 

      Farzam-Kia, Arash (2010-07-07)
      Traditionally, the central threat to the defensibility of the range of practices and attitudes constitutive of moral criticism has been seen to be posed by the Causal Thesis, the view that all actions have antecedent causes ...
    • Promissory Obligation and its Structure of Justification 

      Zhang, Erik Yuan (2015-09-01)
      In my view, the central disagreement in contemporary discussion of promissory obligation stems from two contrasting conceptions of the function of the obligation of promise keeping. Simply put, the disagreement is over ...
    • Recognizing Constraints on Moral Reasoning and the Fairness of Blame 

      Esselmont, Christine N.; Vidt, Christine N. (2014-09-16)
      Many argue that moral blame is unfair when poor formative circumstances negatively influence an individual’s ability to appreciate moral reasons. For example, Susan Wolf refers to the pre-conditions for being blamed as ...
    • Relating to Reasons 

      Langlois, Christopher (2010-09-08)
      While each of us has an intuitive sense of what a reason is, when considered more carefully the concept is not so clear. There are a number of questions to which any successful account of reasons will provide some answer. ...
    • Relationships and the Limits of Reasonable Partiality 

      Ritcey, Nolan S. (2015-01-09)
      The problems associated with an overly impartial moral psychology are well discussed in the literature on utilitarianism, consequentialism, and rational decision moral theory. Criticisms of these approaches to morality ...
    • Responsibility for Self: Agency and the Attitudes 

      Rosner, Mark (2015-09-15)
      This thesis defends the claim that the core idea of moral responsibility is fixed by our best theory of agency. Such a theory concerns the proper conditions of attribution of an attitude or an action to an agent for the ...
    • The Structure of Blame and its Relation to the Moral Emotions 

      Yashinsky, Dalia
      It is not clear what role emotions play in our conception of blame. In this thesis, I aim to understand the role of the emotions in blame, and the question that I explore can be phrased in the following way: is blame ...
    • Valuing Distributive Equality 

      Bremner, Claire (2008-09-27)
      Distributive equality can be valued in different ways, which can be rendered as definitions of ways to value distributive equality. Those definitions can be used to investigate the value, if any, that distributive equality ...
    • Williams, Scanlon, and the Normativity of Morality 

      Maidment, Will
      Most debates about the viability of a given moral theory are won and lost, or at least brought to an end, through resort to a familiar pattern of argument: if a theory calls for that course of action, can it really claim ...