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dc.contributor.authorTolley, Erinen
dc.date2013-04-22 15:21:07.585
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-24T20:36:56Z
dc.date.issued2013-04-24
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/7912
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D, Political Studies) -- Queen's University, 2013-04-22 15:21:07.585en
dc.description.abstractThis study examines how race affects the media’s coverage of candidates in Canadian politics. Situated in the literature on political communication, gendered mediation and race studies, it proposes a new theory of racial mediation, which posits that politics are covered in ways that reflect the assumption of whiteness as standard. Although candidate self-presentation does influence media portrayals, this alone does not account for differences in the framing of candidates’ policy interests, viability and socio-demographic characteristics. The project argues that candidate race has a significant but subtle impact on media portrayals. Articles from the print media coverage of the 2008 Canadian election are analyzed using a hand-coded content analysis, which is replicated through an innovative automated approach. The study finds that visible minority candidates’ coverage is more negative and less prominent than that of their White counterparts. It is less likely to focus on key electoral issues and much more likely to emphasize socio-demographic background. Visible minority candidates are held to a higher standard and in the absence of evidence to the contrary, they are portrayed as less viable and credible than their competitors. Gender can amplify these effects, with raced and gendered discourses characterizing the coverage of visible minority women. The media study is complemented by 40 elite interviews that probe candidates’ communication strategies, issue emphasis and self-presentation, as well as reporters’ negotiation of these elements in their construction of news stories. While there are visible minority candidates who emphasize elements of their ethnocultural heritage, my findings suggest that few rely only on racialized strategies, nor are White candidates immune from racialized appeals. Nonetheless, journalists struggle to adequately portray nuance and candidates’ multi-dimensionality. They employ familiar narratives and tropes, and generally only seize on racialized framing when it applies to visible minority candidates. Although the study does not provide a direct test of media effects on vote choice, it draws on existing literature to argue that because media coverage influences the ways that voters evaluate issues and develop schema for understanding the world around them, the portrayal of visible minority candidates has the potential to alter electoral opportunities and outcomes. As a result, racialized coverage and race continue to matter in Canadian politics.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectVisible minoritiesen
dc.subjectCanadian politicsen
dc.subjectRaceen
dc.subjectContent analysisen
dc.subjectPolitical scienceen
dc.subjectMediaen
dc.titleHow Race Affects the Media's Coverage of Candidates in Canadian Politicsen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.restricted-thesisI wish to restrict access to my thesis to protect my rights to commercial publication.en
dc.description.degreePhDen
dc.contributor.supervisorBanting, Keith G.en
dc.contributor.supervisorGoodyear-Grant, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.departmentPolitical Studiesen
dc.embargo.terms1825en
dc.embargo.liftdate2018-04-23
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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