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dc.contributor.authorEnglish, Christine
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2013-05-23 16:10:53.323en
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-23T20:48:53Z
dc.date.available2013-05-23T20:48:53Z
dc.date.issued2013-05-23
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/8037
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Rehabilitation Science) -- Queen's University, 2013-05-23 16:10:53.323en
dc.description.abstractHome First is an Ontario transition management approach that attempts to reduce the pressure on hospital and Long Term Care (LTC) beds through early discharge planning, the provision of timely and appropriate home care, and the delay of LTC placement. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to obtain descriptions from South Eastern Ontario Home First clients and their family caregivers of their experiences with and thoughts about care transitions, the provision of care, and the Home First approach. The goal was to enable insight into the Home First approach, care transitions, and the provision of care through access to the perspectives of study participants. Nine semi structured interviews (and one or more follow-up calls for each interview) with Home First clients discharged from hospitals in South East Ontario and their family caregivers were conducted and their content analyzed. All participating Home First clients were pleased to be home from hospital and did not consider LTC placement a positive option. All had family involved with their care and used a mix of formal and informal services to meet their care needs. Four general themes were identified: (a) maintaining independence while responding (or not) to risks, (b) constraints on care provision, (c) communication is key, and (d) relationship matters. Although all Home First clients participating in the study were discharged home successfully, a sense of partnership between health care providers, families, and clients was often lacking. The Home First approach may be successfully addressing hospital alternative level of care issues and getting people home where they want to be, but it is also putting increasing demands on formal and informal community caregivers. There is room for improvement in how well their needs and those of care recipients are being met. Health professionals and policy makers must ask caregivers and recipients about their concerns and provide them with appropriate resources and information if they want them to become true partners on the care team.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjecthome support workersen_US
dc.subjecthome health careen_US
dc.subjectcommunity careen_US
dc.subjectolder home support clientsen_US
dc.subjectelder careen_US
dc.subjectdischarge planningen_US
dc.subjectrelationshipsen_US
dc.subjectfamily relationshipsen_US
dc.subjectnursing homeen_US
dc.subjectOntario health careen_US
dc.subjectCanadian health careen_US
dc.subjectplacementen_US
dc.subjectHome Firsten_US
dc.subjecttransition managementen_US
dc.subjectcare transitionsen_US
dc.subjectaging in placeen_US
dc.subjectmaintaining independenceen_US
dc.subjectcaregivingen_US
dc.subjectcommunity health and support servicesen_US
dc.subjectcommunity long-term careen_US
dc.subjectfamily carersen_US
dc.subjectfrail seniorsen_US
dc.subjectclient satisfactionen_US
dc.subjecthospital dischargeen_US
dc.subjecthealth careen_US
dc.subjectolder peopleen_US
dc.subjectageden_US
dc.subjectfrail elderlyen_US
dc.subjectagingen_US
dc.subjectelderlyen_US
dc.subjectsupportive home careen_US
dc.subjectclient perspectivesen_US
dc.subjectlong-term careen_US
dc.subjectquality of careen_US
dc.subjectevaluation of servicesen_US
dc.subjectcare planningen_US
dc.subjectrisken_US
dc.subjectdecisionsen_US
dc.subjectcase managementen_US
dc.subjectcommunicationen_US
dc.subjectindependenceen_US
dc.subjecthome careen_US
dc.subjectconstraints on care provisionen_US
dc.subjectmaintaining independenceen_US
dc.subjectqualitative researchen_US
dc.subjectfamily caregiversen_US
dc.subjectnursing home placementen_US
dc.subjectqualitative descriptionen_US
dc.subjectprogram evaluationen_US
dc.subjectalternative level of careen_US
dc.subjectpatient dischargeen_US
dc.subjectself-careen_US
dc.subjectformal careen_US
dc.subjectaged careen_US
dc.subjectinformal careen_US
dc.subjectpost-discharge careen_US
dc.subjecthome supporten_US
dc.subjectcommunity support servicesen_US
dc.subjecthealth services researchen_US
dc.titleOntario’s Home First Approach, Care Transitions, and the Provision of Care: The Perspectives of Home First Clients and Their Family Caregiversen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeMasteren
dc.contributor.supervisorJamieson, Margareten
dc.contributor.departmentRehabilitation Scienceen


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