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dc.contributor.authorTarga, Ryanen
dc.date2013-09-19 19:02:13.077
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-20T20:36:59Z
dc.date.available2013-09-20T20:36:59Z
dc.date.issued2013-09-20
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/8299
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, History) -- Queen's University, 2013-09-19 19:02:13.077en
dc.description.abstractThe war against Germany was perceived by the majority of English Canadians as a necessity to defend the British Empire, democracy and justice. However, it became increasingly evident to the public that some individuals were being permitted to prosper, while others — particularly those of the working class — endured immense hardship. These individuals who prospered at a level judged excessive became known as "profiteers." Initial criticisms of profiteering were connected to graft, jobbery and patronage apparent in government military purchases. However, as public sacrifices intensified, the morally acceptable extent to which individuals and businesses could profit came to be more narrowly defined. Criticisms of profiteering expanded to challenge the mainstream liberal notions of private wealth and laissez-faire policies as being inequitable and undemocratic. The federal government's unwillingness to seriously implement measures against profiteering led to rising discontent. Consequently, working-class English Canadians aspired to form a 'new democracy' that was worth the sacrifices of the war.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectFood Controlleren
dc.subjectWorld War Oneen
dc.subjectMilitary Contractsen
dc.subjectScandalsen
dc.subject1914-1918en
dc.subjectInflationen
dc.subjectProfiten
dc.subjectLiberalismen
dc.subjectPatronageen
dc.subjectCorruptionen
dc.subjectProfiteersen
dc.subjectProfiteeren
dc.subjectConscriptionen
dc.subjectBig Interestsen
dc.subjectIncome Taxen
dc.subjectGreat Waren
dc.subjectIncome War Taxen
dc.subjectBusiness Profits War Taxen
dc.subjectLiberal Orderen
dc.subjectTaxationen
dc.subjectConscription of Wealthen
dc.subjectCombinesen
dc.subjectGraften
dc.subjectJobberyen
dc.subjectFirst World Waren
dc.subjectEnglish Canadaen
dc.subjectPatriotismen
dc.subjectWorking Classen
dc.subjectEqualityen
dc.subjectEquality of Sacrificeen
dc.subjectRegulationen
dc.subjectShell Committeeen
dc.subjectImperial Munitions Boarden
dc.subjectProfiteeringen
dc.subjectLiberalen
dc.subjectTrustsen
dc.subjectGreat War Veterans Associationen
dc.subjectlaissez-faireen
dc.subjectDemocracyen
dc.subjectBoard of Commerceen
dc.subjectCanadaen
dc.subjectFood Boarden
dc.titleFrom Governors to Grocers: How Profiteering Changed English-Canadian Perspectives of Liberalism in the Great War of 1914-1918en
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeMaster of Artsen
dc.contributor.supervisorMcKay, Ian G.en
dc.contributor.departmentHistoryen
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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