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dc.contributor.authorKocsis, Michael
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2013-09-25 12:11:55.056en
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-26T21:17:37Z
dc.date.available2013-09-26T21:17:37Z
dc.date.issued2013-09-26
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/8316
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D, Philosophy) -- Queen's University, 2013-09-25 12:11:55.056en
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation explores a family of theoretical models of humanitarian military intervention. A number of recent theorists, including Tesón, Caney, Buchanan, Orend, Moellendorf, and Wheeler, build their models from a perspective called ‘cosmopolitanism.’ They offer arguments based on the moral supremacy of human rights, the arbitrary character of territorial boundaries, and the duty to protect individual human beings exposed to serious and systematic violence by their own governments. I develop a model of intervention that recognizes the moral significance of political self-government. To the extent that international society should countenance a ‘duty to protect’ human rights, the duty ought to be constrained by a commitment to the values of self-government. The model developed in this dissertation also recognizes the significance of international law enforcement. Insofar as we should permit a role of enforcement for international human rights, that role should be constrained by formally accepted global principles and in particular by positive obligations to prevent and punish actions regarded as international crimes. These other global values are viewed with suspicion by cosmopolitan theorists, who tend to construe them in stark contrast to the vision of global responsibility for human rights protection. But I will show how these other values emerged simultaneously with cosmopolitanism and share many of its underlying intuitions. Because self-government and law enforcement are linked politically to the cosmopolitan vision, these two distinctive global values can be utilized as tools to fortify or expand cosmopolitanism by enlarging the global sense of responsibility for human rights. The aim of this project is to explain how these other values came to be neglected by cosmopolitan theorists, and why they should not be forgotten.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectMichael Walzeren_US
dc.subjectCosmopolitanismen_US
dc.subjectSelf-Governmenten_US
dc.subjectHumanitarian Interventionen_US
dc.subjectHuman Rightsen_US
dc.subjectGenocideen_US
dc.titleHuman Rights and Self-Government in the Age of Cosmopolitan Interventionismen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreePh.Den
dc.contributor.supervisorKymlicka, Willen
dc.contributor.departmentPhilosophyen


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