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dc.contributor.authorRouette, Julieen
dc.date2013-09-30 12:56:09.362
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-02T18:17:04Z
dc.date.available2014-12-21T09:00:11Z
dc.date.issued2013-10-02
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/8374
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Community Health & Epidemiology) -- Queen's University, 2013-09-30 12:56:09.362en
dc.description.abstractBackground: Health-related quality of life (HRQL) outcomes have been increasingly used in phase III randomized controlled trials to characterize the benefits or risks of a cancer treatment. HRQL outcomes from clinical trials can also inform clinical practice in oncology settings. Previous qualitative research suggests that oncologists value HRQL outcomes but challenges to their clinical application exist. Little quantitative research has been conducted to examine these barriers. This study describes the opinions of oncologists toward HRQL outcomes, the ways in which HRQL outcomes can be presented, and the importance of suggested reporting standards for HRQL outcomes in clinical trials. It further examines the association between attitudinal and demographic factors associated with the self-reported current use and achievable use of HRQL outcomes in clinical practice. Methods: This study is a cross-sectional survey of oncologists. A web-based questionnaire was disseminated in Canada, United Kingdom, and Australia/New Zealand. The study included oncologist members of the NCIC Clinical Trials Group, the NCRI Clinical Studies Groups, and the Australasian Cancer Clinical Trials Groups. Respondents were asked to report their opinions toward HRQL outcomes and the factors associated with the use of these outcomes in clinical practice. Demographic characteristics were also collected. Chi-square tests were used to compare the proportion of responses between countries. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with the use of HRQL outcomes in clinical practice. Results: A total of 344 oncologists completed the survey. Most oncologists (65.9%) reported having a good knowledge of HRQL outcomes and 72% perceived HRQL outcomes to be useful. High current use of HRQL outcomes in clinical practice was associated with more medical practice experience; perceiving HRQL outcomes to be useful; perceiving HRQL measurements to be reliable; and reporting lack of understanding to rarely be a barrier to using HRQL outcomes. High achievable use of HRQL outcomes in clinical practice was associated with being a male oncologist, perceiving HRQL outcomes to be useful, and being an investigator in RCTs. Conclusions: Important factors associated with the use of HRQL outcomes in clinical practice were identified, highlighting the need for future research and education.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectHealth-Related Quality of Lifeen
dc.subjectOncologyen
dc.subjectClinical practiceen
dc.subjectClinical trialsen
dc.titleFrom Clinical Trials to Clinical Practice: An International Survey of Oncologists on Health-Related Quality of Life Outcomesen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.restricted-thesisResults of parent study not yet published.en
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen
dc.contributor.supervisorBrundage, Michael D.en
dc.contributor.departmentCommunity Health and Epidemiologyen
dc.embargo.terms1825en
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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