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dc.contributor.authorRay, Reeju
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2013-10-02 21:24:20.595en
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-03T21:11:28Z
dc.date.issued2013-10-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/8401
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D, History) -- Queen's University, 2013-10-02 21:24:20.595en
dc.description.abstractThe north eastern region in India represents a legacy of uneven imperial state formation inherited by the Indian nation state. My doctoral dissertation examines British imperialism in the nineteenth century, as it operated in “non-British” spaces of the north east frontier of colonial India. I focus on the historical production and cooption of the Khasi and Jaintiah hills, into a frontier space of the British Empire. I analyse the interconnections between physical transformations, colonial structures of law, and colonial knowledge that produced inhabitants of the autonomous polities, north east of Bengal into “hill tribals”. Law provided a foundational framework through which colonial commercial and military advancement into non-British territories such as the Khasi hills was achieved. The most profound implication of colonial processes was on ruler-subject relations, which accompanied the reconstitution of space and inhabitants’ conceptions of self. The dissertation traces both spatial and imaginative transformations that stripped the groups occupying the Khasi and Jaintiah hills of a political identity. The Khasi tribal subject’s relationship to the governing structures was navigated, and negotiated using a reconstituted notion of custom. This project is more than a history of tribal minorities in India. It addresses the crisis of colonial sovereignty in colonial frontiers, and the nature of imperialism in non-British territories. The dissertation also addresses how the hills and its peoples have long resisted incorporation and integration into totalizing histories of colonial modernity, capitalism and nationalism. Social identities of the diverse communities in the north east of India are articulated through, what I have called narratives of continuity that are both constitutive of and framed against colonial knowledge systems. Critical of the “naturalisation of the association between history and western modernity” and the consequent binaries of past and present, this dissertation analyses indigenous narratives, and the articulation of distinct pasts often inhered in the present.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectColonialismen_US
dc.subjectKhasi hillsen_US
dc.subjectBritish Empireen_US
dc.subjectFrontieren_US
dc.titlePLACING THE KHASI JAINTIAH HILLS: SOVEREIGNTY, CUSTOM AND NARRATIVES OF CONTINUITYen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.restricted-thesisI plan on publishing the thesis in the form of a book shortly and would like it to remain restricted for that purpose, until the book is published.en
dc.description.degreePh.Den
dc.contributor.supervisorPande, Ishitaen
dc.contributor.departmentHistoryen
dc.embargo.terms1825en
dc.embargo.liftdate2018-10-02


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