Risk-Taking Behaviour and School Injury in Canadian Adolescents

dc.contributor.authorKwong, Jonathan Lok-Mingen
dc.contributor.departmentCommunity Health and Epidemiologyen
dc.contributor.supervisorPickett, Williamen
dc.contributor.supervisorKlinger, Don A.en
dc.date2015-06-28 14:50:48.642
dc.date2015-07-06 10:22:18.619
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-07T20:35:42Z
dc.date.available2015-07-07T20:35:42Z
dc.date.issued2015-07-07
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Community Health & Epidemiology) -- Queen's University, 2015-07-06 10:22:18.619en
dc.description.abstractBackground: Adolescent school injuries are common and often result in serious consequences. Problem risk behaviours are known causes of injury and interventions have targeted these independent behaviours with modest success in the past. Although there is some research investigating relationships between risk behaviours, none have empirically evaluated measures of multiple risk behaviour using a theoretical framework of adolescent risk-taking. There is a need for research to utilize population health theory to investigate associations between measures of multiple risk behaviour and school injury. Objectives: The objectives of this thesis are to: 1) investigate the relationships between risk behaviours among a sample of Canadian adolescents using a framework of adolescent risk-taking, and 2) to evaluate adolescent risk behaviours and school climate as independent, and perhaps interactive, determinants of school injury under the Population Health Framework. Methods: Both objectives utilized an interim dataset from the 2014 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) Study. Objective 1. Factor-analytically derived (and validated) scales of multiple risk behaviours were used to describe relationships between these behaviours. Objective 2. Students reported their experiences with different types of school injury. Relationships between multiple risk behaviour and school injuries were assessed. The influence of school climate on that relationship was also evaluated. Results: Objective 1. Adolescent risk behaviours appear to cluster into three distinct categories: 1) Overt Risk-Taking, 2) Active Healthy Lifestyle Detriment, and 3) Passive Healthy Lifestyle Detriment. Objective 2. Young, overt-risk takers were identified as a specific high-risk group for general school injuries, as well as several sub-types of school injury. School climate influences relationships between risk behaviour and school injury in complex and context-specific ways. The inconsistency of its effects suggests that it is not an effect modifier. Conclusions: Objective 1. Currently, surveillance, intervention programs, and research target isolated domains of risk behaviour. This thesis shows that risk behaviours cluster in predictable ways and should be studied and addressed in their related groups. Objective 2. Associations between multiple risk behaviour and school injury appear to be strongest among younger students. Effects of school climate on these relationships cannot be easily generalized across different grades or injury types.en
dc.description.degreeM.Sc.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/13394
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsCreative Commons - Attribution - CC BYen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectChild Healthen
dc.subjectSchool Injuryen
dc.subjectRisk Behaviouren
dc.subjectPopulation Health Theoryen
dc.titleRisk-Taking Behaviour and School Injury in Canadian Adolescentsen
dc.typethesisen
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