Prison and its Afterlives: Haunting and the Emotional Geographies of Formerly Incarcerated People’s Reintegration Experiences in Kingston, Ontario, Canada

dc.contributor.authorLachapelle, Sophieen
dc.contributor.departmentKinesiology and Health Studiesen
dc.contributor.supervisorKing, Samantha
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-11T20:18:39Z
dc.date.available2020-09-11T20:18:39Z
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen
dc.description.abstractKingston is undeniably a prison town. As the venue for Canada’s first prison and current home to nearly twenty percent of the nation’s federally incarcerated people in seven penitentiaries around the city, prisons undoubtedly influence the economic, political, and social life of Kingston. While Kingston’s identity as a prison town is touted by the local municipality as beneficial for the community, people who have been incarcerated and released into Kingston have a different story to tell. Reintegration – the process of leaving prison and re-entering the community – is inevitable for the majority of incarcerated people in Canada. However, people who are released from prison into Kingston have reported significant difficulties maintaining lasting or successful reintegration despite the overwhelming presence of local prisons, their supporting administration, and an extensive network of non-profit and charitable service providers. Reintegration into the community is not only a physically exhausting experience, but one that is emotionally fraught with feelings of anticipation, uncertainty, fear, anger, and boredom. Based on twenty-three interviews with formerly incarcerated people in Kingston, I argue that attending to the emotional geographies of reintegration in Kingston, where people both struggle with and resist violent reintegration discourses of risk and responsibility, is critical to developing a more equitable reintegration praxis. I contend that understanding how people with prison experiences feel in the community not only brings the ethics of current reintegration practices into question; it also reveals how neoliberal discourses of risk and responsibility extend beyond the walls of the prison, prolonging the haunting effects of the settler-colonial carceral state in the everyday lives of formerly incarcerated people.en
dc.description.degreeM.A.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/28113
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.rightsAttribution 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectPrisonen
dc.subjectHauntingen
dc.subjectEmotional Geographiesen
dc.subjectIncarcerationen
dc.subjectReintegrationen
dc.subjectRisken
dc.subjectKingstonen
dc.titlePrison and its Afterlives: Haunting and the Emotional Geographies of Formerly Incarcerated People’s Reintegration Experiences in Kingston, Ontario, Canadaen
dc.typethesisen
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