The Effects of Self-Guided Meditation and Napping on Memory Consolidation in Humans

dc.contributor.authorDastgheib, Mohammaden
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen
dc.contributor.supervisorDringenberg, Hansen
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-30T18:48:38Z
dc.date.available2020-01-30T18:48:38Z
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen
dc.description.abstractNumerous studies have reported that, compared to an equivalent period of wakefulness, post-training sleep (overnight or daytime naps) benefits memory consolidation (Diekelmann & Born, 2010; Mednick, Nakayama, & Stickgold, 2003; Plihal & Born, 1999; Walker et al., 2003). However, most investigations have employed various forms of “active wakefulness” (e.g., sensorimotor and cognitive tasks) as a comparison condition for sleep, while few studies have examined the role of “quiet wakefulness” in memory consolidation, even though some of the EEG oscillations during quiet waking resemble those present in sleep (e.g., increased activity in the theta-alpha range) (Brokaw et al., 2016). This study aimed to examine the consolidation of declarative (word-pair associates) and non-declarative (marble maze visuo-motor task) learning over a 60-minutes time interval (with continuous EEG monitoring) filled with either (A) napping; (B) active-waking (watching a video); or (C) quiet-waking (self-guided meditation). The results of the current study suggested that memory consolidation may not be a sleep-specific- phenomenon. In fact, quiet wakefulness appeared to be more advantageous than a short nap for the consolidation of declarative memories. This study also found that SWS exerts significant effects on the retention of non-declarative memory. For nappers, the absence of SWS resulted in noticeable performance enhancements compared to participants who entered SWS. Thus, it is possible that SWS plays a disadvantageous role in the consolidation of procedural memory. It is thought that sleep inertia caused by SWS is partly responsible for the impairments in tasks procedural memory. The findings of current study contribute to the understanding of memory consolidation and provide insights about the role of waking states for future studies.en
dc.description.degreeM.Sc.en
dc.embargo.liftdate2025-01-30
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/27576
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United Statesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/
dc.subjectMemoryen
dc.subjectMemory Consolidationen
dc.subjectSleepen
dc.subjectMindfulness Meditationen
dc.subjectMindfulnessen
dc.subjectNapen
dc.subjectQuiet Wakefulnessen
dc.titleThe Effects of Self-Guided Meditation and Napping on Memory Consolidation in Humansen
dc.typethesisen
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