Queen's University - Utility Bar

QSpace at Queen's University >
Theses, Dissertations & Graduate Projects >
Queen's Theses & Dissertations >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/1088

Title: Academic achievement, academic self-concept, and academic motivation of immigrant adolescents in Greater Toronto Area (GTA) secondary schools
Authors: Areepattamannil, Shaljan

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
MEdThesis2006.pdf8.14 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
Keywords: Academic achievement
Immigrant adolescents
Academic motivation
Academic self-concept
Issue Date: 2008
Series/Report no.: Canadian theses
Abstract: This study examined the academic achievement, academic self-concept, and academic motivation of 573 immigrant and non-immigrant adolescents in two public secondary schools in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). Multivariate analyses revealed statistically significant differences between immigrant and non-immigrant adolescents with respect to their academic achievement, academic self-concept, and academic motivation. In addition, supplemental exploratory analyses indicated significant ethnic group differences in academic achievement, academic self-concept, and academic motivation. Surprisingly and importantly, analyses showed the absence of statistically significant gender differences among immigrant adolescents in terms of their academic achievement, academic self-concept, and academic motivation. Results from multiple linear regression analyses provided support for the Self-Description Questionnaire II as a measurement to be used with both immigrant and non-immigrant adolescents. In contrast, support for the Academic Motivation Scale, which is based on the Self-Determination Theory, was not adequately substantiated in the current research for either immigrants or non-immigrants.
Description: Thesis (Master, Education) -- Queen's University, 2007-11-20 10:34:07.043
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1974/1088
Appears in Collections:Queen's Theses & Dissertations
Education Graduate Theses

Items in QSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

  DSpace Software Copyright © 2002-2008  The DSpace Foundation - TOP