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dc.contributor.authorLedoux, Luka
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2015-12-19 12:14:31.829en
dc.date2015-12-22 15:22:16.45en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-05T20:45:34Z
dc.date.available2016-01-05T20:45:34Z
dc.date.issued2016-01-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/13909
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Mining Engineering) -- Queen's University, 2015-12-22 15:22:16.45en
dc.description.abstractThere are two components to a blast which create damage in a rock or grout material: the initial stress wave, followed by the crack penetrating gases. In order to understand the development of fragmentation in grout as a result of the individual and combined action of these components, three types of experiments were conducted. Medium scale grout cylinders were used to measure pressures in the material away from a detonating charge, located in a borehole having the same axis. Some of the cylinders were lined with copper tubes to minimize gas penetration from the detonation of the charge. It was determined that there are statistically significant differences in the slope of the attenuation of pressure for unlined spherical and lined cylindrical samples. Small scale grout cylinders loaded with various charges and coupling configurations were blasted with reduced loads in order to crack the cylinders without destroying them. This process allowed for measurement of the crack patterns produced. A third of the samples were lined with copper tubes, another third were stemmed without tubes. The remaining samples were not stemmed nor lined. Post blast analysis revealed that individual cracks were significantly propagated by gases in unlined samples. However, when measuring overall damage, there were no significant differences between copper lined, unlined and stemmed samples. These results suggested that stress waves were mainly responsible for the crack patterns produced. Computer modelling using Particle Flow Code (PFC) was performed to confirm experimental crack patterns of small scale grout cylinders. PFC produced similar cracks as the small scale cylinders, in number and length, without modelling gas penetration. A secondary study into delay times showed evidence of short delay times being the most effective in producing smaller fragments. This confirmed the role of stress waves as a major contributor towards developing fragmentation.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsCreative Commons - Attribution - CC BYen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectGasesen_US
dc.subjectStress Wavesen_US
dc.subjectFragmentationen_US
dc.subjectBlastingen_US
dc.titleThe Role of Stress Waves and Gases in the Development of Fragmentationen_US
dc.typethesisen_US
dc.description.degreeMasteren
dc.contributor.supervisorKatsabanis, Panagiotis (Takis) D.en
dc.contributor.departmentMining Engineeringen


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