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dc.contributor.authorCompeau, Scott
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2016-01-08 17:37:32.148en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-11T22:24:18Z
dc.date.available2016-01-11T22:24:18Z
dc.date.issued2016-01-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/13924
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Mechanical and Materials Engineering) -- Queen's University, 2016-01-08 17:37:32.148en
dc.description.abstractThe focus of this research study was to provide insight into high school students’ perceptions of engineering and the work engineers do. Participants included Grades 9 and 10 students, all of which were enrolled in academic English, Math, Science courses and are on the pathway towards college or university. This research was framed within a constructivist theoretical framework, and sequential multiple methods were utilized for data collection. The phase 1 questionnaire incorporated closed and open-ended questions pertaining to the engineering profession and was completed by 97 students, while 11 students participated in the phase 2 semi-structured interviews. The findings show that the major categories that emerged from these students’ descriptions of engineering involve the mental aspects of designing or creating, knowledge in Math and Science, and the physical aspect of building. In addition, some students were very clear that designers are the source of creative and innovative ideas, scientists are the source of new theories, and engineers are responsible for turning those creative ideas and/or the new theories into reality by physically building something. The perception that engineering involves building was a major source of confusion as many of these students described engineers in roles that could also be used to describe skilled trades. Therefore, a significant percentage of these Grades 9 and 10 students have unclear views about engineering, which suggests they currently cannot make an informed decision in considering engineering for a possible career path. An increase in student awareness of the engineering profession is needed to ensure students have the knowledge to make informed career choices, which may lead to achieving high-quality engineering graduates and diversifying the profession in Canada. One way to meet the current demand for engineers within Canada may be to ensure that pre-university students have sufficient knowledge about the work of a professional engineer as well as the important aspects of the profession. With this knowledge, they can make an informed decision in considering engineering as a possible choice for post-secondary study.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsCreative Commons - Attribution - CC BYen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectEngineeringen_US
dc.subjectStudentsen_US
dc.subjectPerceptionsen_US
dc.subjectHigh schoolen_US
dc.titleThe calling of an engineer: High school students' perceptions of engineeringen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeMasteren
dc.contributor.supervisorStrong, David S.en
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical and Materials Engineeringen


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