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dc.contributor.authorBessette, Francoiseen
dc.date2008-09-04 11:36:28.395
dc.date.accessioned2008-09-04T16:34:09Z
dc.date.available2008-09-04T16:34:09Z
dc.date.issued2008-09-04T16:34:09Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/1404
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Sociology) -- Queen's University, 2008-09-04 11:36:28.395en
dc.description.abstractUsing a social constructionist perspective, this thesis explores the development of the concepts of “parental alienation syndrome” and “false allegations” in the context of custody and access, as ‘social problems’. Following Joel Best’s framework for critically analysing social problems, it examines the life course of these concepts through an historical account of Canada’s divorce arena and recent changes to custody and access law. It analyzes the reasoning and motives of the major claimsmakers: the Fathers’ Right Movement, medical experts, the legal arena and the counter-claims of Feminist activists. It examines the role of the supervised access facilitator in the construction of the concepts as ‘social problems’. The theories of psychiatrist Richard Gardner are examined in particular, due to their pivotal role in the advancement of the claimsmakers’ goals. Finally, empirical studies are reviewed and analyzed, demonstrating how the concepts of “parental alienation syndrome” and “false allegations” have mutated and permeated the domain of divorce and access in Western society.en
dc.format.extent393715 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectsupervised accessen
dc.subjectparental alienation syndromeen
dc.subjectfalse allegationsen
dc.subjectFather's Rights Movementen
dc.titleDisciplining Divorcing Parents: The Social Construction of Parental Alienation Syndromeen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeM.A.en
dc.contributor.supervisorHamilton, Robertaen
dc.contributor.departmentSociologyen
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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