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dc.contributor.authorBaker, Joseph
dc.contributor.authorYardley, John
dc.contributor.authorCôté, Jean
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-31T19:38:36Z
dc.date.available2016-05-31T19:38:36Z
dc.date.issued2016-05-31
dc.identifier.issn0047-0767
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/14477
dc.description.abstractThe coach can have a profound impact on athlete satisfaction, regardless of the level of sport involvement. Previous research has identified differences between coaching behavior preferences in team and individual sport athletes. The present study examined the moderating effect that an athlete's sport type (i.e., individual or team) may have on the relationships among seven coaching behaviors (mental preparation, technical skills, goal setting, physical training, competition strategies, personal rapport, and negative personal rapport) for predicting coaching satisfaction. Moderated multiple regression analyses indicated that each of the seven coaching behaviors were significant main effect predictors of coaching satisfaction. However, sport type (i.e., team or individual sports) was found to moderate six of the seven relationships: mental preparation, technical skills, goal setting, competition strategies, personal rapport, and negative personal rapport in predicting satisfaction with the coach. These findings indicate that high coaching satisfaction for athletes in team sports is influenced to a greater extent by the demonstration of these behaviors than it is for individual sport athletes.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectCoachingen_US
dc.subjectSatisfactionen_US
dc.titleCoach Behaviors and Athlete Satisfaction in Team and Individual Sportsen_US


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