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dc.contributor.authorSoon-Shiong, Raquelen
dc.date2016-07-30 16:51:54.981
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-05T20:59:53Z
dc.date.issued2016-08-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/14689
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Biology) -- Queen's University, 2016-07-30 16:51:54.981en
dc.description.abstractUnidirectional hybridization between bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and pumpkinseed (L. gibbosus) sunfish enables researchers to explore the relative expression of paternal and maternal alleles in hybrids. Past studies have found that the metabolic dysfunction in bluegill-pumpkinseed hybrids may be due to incompatibilities between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. However, the consequences of hybridization on body size and muscle growth have not been examined. This topic is particularly interesting because hybrids grow larger than parentals despite the fact that they are often sired by smaller, precociously mature bluegills. In order to improve our understanding of growth dynamics in hybrid sunfish, I conducted real-time quantitative PCR using species-specific primers on the white muscle tissue of bluegills, pumpkinseeds, and hybrids collected from Lake Opinicon, ON. Five growth factors that have been linked to muscle growth and body size demonstrated similar expression for maternal and paternal alleles. While about half of the hybrids showed the same pattern with myogenin, about half showed very low levels of mRNA for the paternal (bluegill) gene. While this did not explain the heterosis seen in hybrids, it may explain the small body phenotype of the cuckholding bluegill males. I explored the upstream genetic structure of bluegill myogenin and established that four alleles exist within the population. Furthermore, I uncovered a relationship in hybrids between the proximal promoter/ 5’ UTR of myogenin and its transcript level. I found that the hybrids demonstrating low paternal myogenin expression unfailingly possessed A3 or A4 alleles, but future studies will be needed to reveal the molecular links between the genotype and the growth phenotype. A similar genotype-phenotype association was not obvious in parentals, even those that were homozygous for these alleles. Whether this relationship can provide insight into the genetic determinants of bluegill alternative mating strategies has yet to be determined.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsCreative Commons - Attribution - CC BYen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectBluegillen
dc.subjectAlternative Reproductive Strategiesen
dc.subjectGrowthen
dc.subjectHybriden
dc.subjectGrowth Regulatory Factorsen
dc.subjectPumpkinseeden
dc.subjectSunfishen
dc.titleMaternal and Paternal Growth Regulatory Factor Expression in Hybrid Sunfishen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.restricted-thesisRestrict until April 2017. More data is required for publication.en
dc.description.degreeM.Sc.en
dc.contributor.supervisorMoyes, Christopher D.en
dc.contributor.departmentBiologyen
dc.embargo.terms1825en
dc.embargo.liftdate2021-08-04
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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