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dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Eric
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-09T19:32:28Z
dc.date.available2017-01-09T19:32:28Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/15316
dc.description.abstractPredictive models of species distributions are important tools for fisheries management. Unfortunately, these predictive models can be difficult to perform on large waterbodies where fish are difficult to detect and exhaustive sampling is not possible. In recent years the development of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and new occupancy modelling techniques has improved our ability to predict distributions across landscapes as well as account for imperfect detection. I surveyed the nearshore fish community at 105 sites between Kingston, Ontario and Rockport, Ontario with the objective of modelling geographic and environmental characteristics associated with littoral fish distributions. Occupancy modelling was performed on Round Goby, Yellow perch, and Lepomis spp. Modelling with geographic and environmental covariates revealed the effect of shoreline exposure on nearshore habitat characteristics and the occupancy of Round Goby. Yellow Perch, and Lepomis spp. occupancy was most strongly associated negatively with distance to a wetland. These results are consistent with past research on large lake systems indicate the importance of wetlands and shoreline exposure in determining the fish community of the littoral zone. By examining 3 species with varying rates of occupancy and detection, this study was also able to demonstrate the variable utility of occupancy modelling.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsCC0 1.0 Universal*
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/*
dc.subjectFisheriesen_US
dc.subjectEcologyen_US
dc.subjectLake Ontarioen_US
dc.subjectSt. Lawrence Riveren_US
dc.subjectRound Gobyen_US
dc.subjectYellow Perchen_US
dc.subjectSunfishen_US
dc.subjectOccupancy modellingen_US
dc.subjectBiologyen_US
dc.subjectConservationen_US
dc.titleFish Distributions in Lake Ontario's Eastern Basin and the Upper St. Lawrence River: An Analysis Using GIS and Occupancy Modelling Techniquesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.supervisorTufts, Bruce L.en
dc.contributor.departmentBiologyen


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CC0 1.0 Universal
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as CC0 1.0 Universal