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dc.contributor.authorBerg, Nancyen
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-26T19:17:49Z
dc.date.available2017-04-26T19:17:49Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/15696
dc.description.abstractSlopes are often monitored by measuring deformation rates, or the factor of safety is estimated through the use of limit equilibrium stability models to evaluate the risk of failure. In this thesis, three novel landslide monitoring technologies are advanced, assessed, and applied using three strategically chosen field sites. Firstly, it was investigated if acoustic emissions (AE) could be used to measure the displacement of extremely slow-moving landslides. By installing a shallow and a deep AE sensor as well as a ShapeAccelArray (SAA) in a slope located in Peace River, Alberta, it was found that data from a shallow AE sensor allows noise to be filtered from the deep AE sensor data, and that smaller displacement rates than previously expected can be measured using an AE sensor. The second monitoring advance explored a method of measuring 3D slope displacement using digital image correlation (DIC) performed on hillshade images (image of shaded point cloud data). Through the use of synthetic movement tests and experimental data, it was found that 3D displacement can be measured using hillshade images at two different view angles and that small deformations leading to failure can be measured allowing the time to failure to be calculated. Thirdly, point cloud data produced from historical air photos was used to investigate whether historical slope profiles could be produced to serve as a quantitative baseline of historical landslide activity. This hypothesis was tested to investigate the impact of land-use change on retrogressive landslides occurring along a waterway. Natural revegetation of the area around the creek was observed to result in a significant decrease in the volume of landslide debris generated by geomorphic processes. Finally, back analyses were conducted to estimate the mobilised shear strength at failure through the use of monitoring data from two 3.5 metre high earth dams brought to failure. This unique dataset provided an assessment of the repeatability of the back analyses and showed that only a small component of apparent cohesion arises from a combination of dilation, unsaturated soil behaviour, or root reinforcement.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectPhotogrammetryen
dc.subjectDigital Image Correlationen
dc.subjectBack Analysis of Mobilised Shear Strengthen
dc.subjectAcoustic Emissionsen
dc.titleAdvancement, Assessment, and Application of Novel Landslide Monitoring Technologiesen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreePhDen
dc.contributor.supervisorTake, W. Andyen
dc.contributor.departmentCivil Engineeringen
dc.embargo.termsI would like to restrict my thesis in order to have time to publish the manuscripts before the thesis is available to the public.en
dc.embargo.liftdate2022-04-25T00:32:33Z
dc.embargo.liftdate2022-04-25T23:04:58Z
dc.embargo.liftdate2022-04-25T23:38:04Z
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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