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dc.contributor.authorWilles, Brett Cassady
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-30T17:49:09Z
dc.date.available2017-06-30T17:49:09Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/15921
dc.description.abstractMy thesis takes as its central question ongoing colonialism in white queer settler affective and discursive relationships to the prairies and to “home.” I engage with the works of queer and feminist Indigenous theorists, poets, and arts by the likes of Gregory Scofield, Adrian Stimson, Erica Violet Lee, Zoe Todd, Billy-Ray Belcourt in order to fully articulate my critique of queer settler colonialism. I observe how white queer settlers experience their queerness as an obstacle to full and immediate participation in the settler colonial project, which hinges on cis and heteronormativity, and then recuperate their belonging through queer articulations of colonial claims to home on occupied Indigenous lands. Over the course of this project, I also notice how whiteness mobilizes both anti-Black racism and Indigenous dispossession. In order to investigate these white queer affective attachments to home, I work closely with cultural production made by white queer settlers from Edmonton and Calgary, specifically works by Darrin Hagen, Trevor Anderson, and Rae Spoon. I find it necessary to take these books, films, and music seriously as they are located within and reproduce larger systems of settler colonialism.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectIndigenous Studiesen_US
dc.subjectSettler Colonialismen_US
dc.subjectQueeren_US
dc.subjectPrairieen_US
dc.titleDrag, Demons, and Dirt: Centering Indigenous Thought in Critiques of Prairie Queer Settler Colonialismen_US
dc.typethesisen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
dc.contributor.supervisorMorgensen, Scott Lauriaen
dc.contributor.departmentGender Studiesen
dc.embargo.termsI'd like to restrict my thesis for two years, as I explore other publication and distribution options.en_US
dc.embargo.liftdate2022-06-29T21:02:54Z
dc.embargo.liftdate2022-06-30T14:08:33Z


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