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dc.contributor.authorKyres, Mariaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-25T22:11:44Z
dc.date.available2017-09-25T22:11:44Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/22750
dc.description.abstractIn the last decade, the conversation surrounding racial profiling and carding in the city of Toronto garnered much public and scholarly attention. Many journalists, academics and activists have examined the Community Contacts Policy, also known as carding, as well as mass incarceration and the police shootings and killings of unarmed, young Black men. The Yonge Street Uprising and the carding controversy in Toronto serve as two case studies to explore the ways that Black men have been disproportionately profiled, policed and surveilled in this country, particularly in the province of Ontario. Despite the fact that the Yonge Street Uprising and the carding controversy occurred decades apart, a common thread throughout both cases was the narrative of Black male criminality. In addition, it became apparent that many of the practices employed in contemporary society, such as racial profiling, carding and mass incarceration were derived from slavery, with the goal of limiting the freedom and mobility of Black people. Therefore, an examination of Canada’s historical treatment of Black people is necessary in order to demonstrate how practices rooted in slavery, such as, fugitive slave advertisements and historical representations of Black criminality helped inform current police practices. Through an analysis of historical, legal, criminological, and critical race scholarship, this work seeks to examine how and why Black people, specifically Black men, were and continue to be disproportionately more likely to be policed, surveilled and incarcerated. In addition, neighborhood contexts were examined to determine whether there was a relationship between police stop and search practices among different neighborhoods. An analysis of quantitative and qualitative data gathered from various bodies of criminological and legal research, and reports commissioned by the Ontario government, provide support for the theory that the Canadian state criminalize and incarcerates certain populations it deems undesirable. Additionally, a consistent theme throughout this analysis was a heightened sense of anxiety and threat that whites have historically exemplified in relation to Black immigration, mobilization and resistance.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectAnti-Black Racismen
dc.subjectCardingen
dc.subjectRacial Profilingen
dc.subjectPolice Brutalityen
dc.subjectResistanceen
dc.subjectReport Writingen
dc.subjectSlaveryen
dc.titleFrom the Yonge Street Riot to the Carding Controversy: Policing and Surveilling the Black Community in Toronto, Canada, 1992-2016en
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeM.A.en
dc.contributor.supervisorWalker, Barringtonen
dc.contributor.departmentCultural Studiesen
dc.embargo.termsI would like to restrict my thesis for five years as I am thinking of publishing my work as well as possibly pursuing doctoral studies and building off of my MA thesis.en
dc.embargo.liftdate2020-06-15
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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