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dc.contributor.authorCouturier, Don
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-25T17:22:17Z
dc.date.available2018-04-25T17:22:17Z
dc.date.issued2017-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/24043
dc.descriptionA Compilation of Essays by Master's Students in the School of Policy Studies, Queen's Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractThere are at least four deficiencies in the current approach to fiscal transfers between the federal government and First Nations. First, funding is insufficient for First Nations to deliver effective programs and services that will improve outcomes on-reserve and in communities. Second, funding is short-term, and therefore is neither predictable nor sustainable. Third, funding does not allow for growth to address rising costs in service delivery, inflation, and increases in governance capacity. Fourth, the current system of separate grants, each with their own reporting and accountability requirements, creates heavy and unnecessary administrative burdens for First Nations. Provided it is applied appropriately, Territorial Formula Financing (TFF) addresses these problems and provides a financial framework for autonomy and a nation-to-nation partnership. The following paper analyzes the TFF as a new model for First Nations and offers specific recommendations for how this model could be modified and applied.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSchool of Policy Studies, Queen's Universityen_US
dc.subjectFirst Nations Governmentsen_US
dc.subjectTerritorial Formula Financingen_US
dc.subjectFirst Nationsen_US
dc.subjectTFFen_US
dc.titleTerritorial Formula Financing in the Context of First Nations Governmentsen_US
dc.title.alternativePolicy Perspectives on First Nations Issuesen_US
dc.typejournal articleen_US


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