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dc.contributor.authorDettinger, Kaylaen
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-21T14:05:41Z
dc.date.available2018-09-21T14:05:41Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/24859
dc.description.abstractTo know the history of the Pilgrim Trust is to also know Britain’s response to several of its greatest challenges of the twentieth century. Still in operation today, the Pilgrim Trust directly engaged at both national and local levels with some of the major events that we consider to define modern Britain, namely the unemployment of the 1930s, the Second World War, and the debate concerning the national character. As a charity it is perhaps most well-known for sponsoring the unemployment study Men Without Work, funding the Arts Council of Great Britain’s predecessor the Council for the Encouragement of Music and the Arts, and assisting in the preservation of some of the country’s most iconic architecture through restorations and pictorial records such as the Recording Britain series. However, a close reading of the Trust’s archive reveals a much more complex and intriguing history of an association of elite men operating at the highest national level with ample funds attempting to come to the “rescue of the things that mattered in our country” as a self-defined “salvage corps.” This thesis is not solely a history of a charity from 1930 to 1960, but also a case study for social and cultural histories of Britain. It examines how the charity interacted with consequential debates on matters such as charity law, unemployment relief, the voluntary sector in the welfare state, church and state relations, national character, and modernity. It also situates the Pilgrim Trust within the larger historiography on community, citizenship, nation, welfare, and heritage to argue that the Pilgrim Trust was an invisible hand in promoting an insular, rural, and nostalgic image of Britain as stewards of the nation.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectBritainen
dc.subjectBritish Historyen
dc.subjectCharityen
dc.subjectPhilanthropyen
dc.subjectUnemploymenten
dc.subjectSecond World Waren
dc.subjectWorld War IIen
dc.subjectSocial Surveyen
dc.subjectCultureen
dc.subjectArten
dc.subjectHeritageen
dc.subjectChristianityen
dc.subjectCitizenshipen
dc.subjectCommunityen
dc.subjectNationen
dc.subjectEnglanden
dc.subjectConservativeen
dc.subjectBritishnessen
dc.subjectPreservationen
dc.subjectRestorationen
dc.subjectCountrysideen
dc.subjectSocial Welfareen
dc.subjectWelfare Stateen
dc.subjectVoluntary Sectoren
dc.subjectModernityen
dc.subjectTwentieth Centuryen
dc.subjectPilgrim Trusten
dc.subjectChurch of Englanden
dc.titleThe Pilgrim Trust: A History of a "salvage corps" and its Efforts to Preserve the Image of the Nation during Britain's Mid-Twentieth Centuryen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeM.A.en
dc.contributor.supervisorden Otter, Sandraen
dc.contributor.departmentHistoryen
dc.embargo.termsI have been advised to restrict my thesis to pursue potential academic publication opportunities. I would like to restrict the thesis for the maximum of five years in the event publishing the complete thesis as a book is a possibility.en
dc.embargo.liftdate2023-09-21T00:41:56Z
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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