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dc.contributor.authorSubedi, Sonyen
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-01T21:52:06Z
dc.date.available2018-10-01T21:52:06Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/24932
dc.description.abstractBackground: Child abuse remains a public health and human rights issue with severe consequences. Natural disasters can cause physical, social, and psychological stressors, which may lead to an increase in child directed abuse. Objective: The aim of this study was to i) investigate the social and living conditions of households in Haiti pre- and post 2010 Haiti earthquake, ii) to determine the household prevalence of emotional, physical, and severe physical abuse in children aged 2-14 post-earthquake, and iii) to explore the association between earthquake-related loss and experiences of emotional, physical, and severe physical child abuse in the household. Methods: A nationally representative sample of Haitian households from the 2005/6 (n=9888) and 2012 (n=13181) cycle of the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) was used. Descriptive analysis was summarized using frequencies and measures of central tendency. Chi-squared and independent T-tests were used to compare data that was available pre-and post-earthquake. Associations between earthquake-related loss and emotional, physical, and severe physical child abuse was assessed using multivariate log-binomial regression models. Results: Comparing pre-post-earthquake, noteworthy improvements were observed in the educational attainment of the household head (9.1% decrease in “no education” category) and in possession of the following household items: electricity, television, mobile-phone, and radio. The prevalence estimates of emotional, physical, and severe physical abuse, in the month prior to the 2012 survey, was 78.5%, 77.0%, and 15.4% respectively. Two years following the earthquake, death of a household member was associated with a higher likelihood of a child being victim to emotional (RR=1.11, 95% CI: 1.05-1.17) and severe physical abuse (RR=1.49, 95% CI: 1.14-1.94). Conversely, injury of a household member was associated with a lower likelihood of a child experiencing emotional abuse (RR=0.67, 95% CI: 0.52-0.87). Visual mapping revealed that the prevalence of severe physical abuse in settlement camps was notably higher (25.0%) compared to the overall prevalence in Haiti (15.4%). Conclusions: Results of this study highlight a need to better protect children in Haiti from abuse. We found associations between some forms of earthquake related loss and child abuse patterns that would warrant further study and consideration in other contexts of natural disaster.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.rightsCC0 1.0 Universalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/
dc.subjectHaitien
dc.subjectNatural Disastersen
dc.subjectChildrenen
dc.subjectChild Abuseen
dc.subjectChild Protectionen
dc.subjectEarthquakeen
dc.titleEmotional and Physical Child Abuse in the Aftermath of Natural Disasters: a Focus on Haitien
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeM.Sc.en
dc.contributor.supervisorDavison, Colleenen
dc.contributor.supervisorBartels, Susanen
dc.contributor.departmentPublic Health Sciencesen
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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Queen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canada
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Queen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canada