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dc.contributor.authorMelvin, Alexandria
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-16T15:05:19Z
dc.date.available2018-10-16T15:05:19Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/24981
dc.description.abstractBackground: Individuals with more depressive symptoms are more likely to seek treatment. However, there is evidence suggesting that these same individuals may be more likely to feel stigmatized. As expectations of public stigmatization may discourage treatment-seeking from those who would benefit the most, it is important to gain a better understanding of the interplay among these variables. Objective: The aim of this thesis was to determine if perceived public stigma towards people with depression acts as a mediator in the relationship between the number of depressive symptoms and mental health treatment-seeking behaviour. Methods: This study utilized secondary, cross sectional data from Statistics Canada’s 2010 Canadian Community Health Survey, including a rapid response stigma module. Participants (ages 12-101) were from the regions of Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Alberta, and the Northwest Territories and were interviewed between May-June 2010 (N = 2,087). SAS 9.4 survey procedures incorporated the sampling weights and bootstrap variance estimation procedures. Multiple linear regression and logistic regression were used to assess the associations of interest. Sobel’s formula for standard error was used to construct 95% confidence intervals around the estimate of the indirect effect. Results: For both females and males, the number of depressive symptoms experienced positively predicted the likelihood of mental health treatment-seeking. In females, but not in males, there was a significant, positive association between number of depressive symptoms and perceived public stigma. For both females and males, when the number of depressive symptoms was statistically controlled, there was no association between perceived public stigma towards depression and mental health treatment-seeking. Perceived public stigma towards depression did not mediate the relationship between number of depressive symptoms and mental health treatment-seeking behaviour. Conclusion: Results of this study show that perceived public stigma towards depression does not mediate the relationship between number of depressive symptoms and mental health treatment-seeking behaviour. As one of the first studies to assess the associations among number of depressive symptoms, perceived public stigma towards depression, and mental health treatment-seeking behaviour, the results from this study contribute new information to the mixed body of literature.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectpublic stigma, treatment-seeking, help-seeking, depression, symptomsen_US
dc.titleExploring Perceptions of Public Stigma as a Mediator in the Relationship between Number of Depressive Symptoms and Mental Health Treatment-Seeking Behavioursen_US
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.supervisorStuart, Heather
dc.contributor.supervisorStuart, Heather
dc.contributor.departmentPublic Health Sciencesen_US
dc.embargo.termsRestriction is requested, as we are planning to publish the manuscript in the near future.en_US
dc.embargo.liftdate2023-10-13T19:12:20Z


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