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dc.contributor.authorGrossutti, Christine
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-25T16:06:35Z
dc.date.available2018-10-25T16:06:35Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/24989
dc.description.abstractThis thesis employs an innovative methodological approach to provide a historical geography of the Frontenac Arch Biosphere Reserve (FABR), an area designated by the United Nations’ Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization’s Man and the Biosphere (MAB) program. Through a walking research method conducted in five hiking locations within the FABR, I identified important themes and current issues related to the key concepts used to define and understand biosphere reserves; ecology, ecosystem, conservation, and sustainable development and followed them back through the institutional history of MAB. By attending to the complexity of meanings held by each of the key concepts, the research seeks to identify moments of possibility within MAB’s past for promoting the FABR's purpose as a site of socio-ecological learning. These moments are at risk of being forgotten as social issues are generally overshadowed by a focus on economic development within the World Network of Biosphere Reserves. The research presented here provides important historical and political context to help situate the current approach to sustainable development at the FABR by attending to three other overlapping institutional temporal scales centered around the following key events: the creation of UNESCO and its conservation organizations from 1929-1969; the planning and implementation of the MAB program from 1968-2000; and finally, the implementation of Canada’s national MAB program from 1972-2000. The key contributions of this work include a historical geographical methodology that blends embodied walking research with archival inquiry, a summary of resources from MAB’s history for biosphere reserve practitioners in Canada who are working towards building positive cross-cultural relationships with Indigenous individuals and organizations, and the documentation of key insights from MAB’s history related to ongoing efforts in the discipline of geography to a meaningful integration of the human and physical sciences.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectwalking methodologyen_US
dc.subjecthistorical geographies of natureen_US
dc.subjectFrontenac Arch Biosphere Reserveen_US
dc.subjectUNESCOen_US
dc.subjectMABen_US
dc.subjectBiosphere Reservesen_US
dc.titleWalking Toward Respect: Historical Geographies of Nature and Possibility in UNESCO MAB’S Frontenac Arch Biosphere Reserveen_US
dc.typeThesisen
dc.description.degreeDoctor of Philosophyen_US
dc.contributor.supervisorCameron, Laura
dc.contributor.departmentGeography and Planningen_US
dc.embargo.termsNeed to protect rights to commercial publication.en_US
dc.embargo.liftdate2023-10-24T20:40:35Z


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