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dc.contributor.authorMatorina, Nelly
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-31T18:48:21Z
dc.date.available2018-10-31T18:48:21Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/25652
dc.description.abstractTo better understand the world, humans scan the information contents of our experiences for patterns, corresponding to the extraction of gist, or essential meaning (Brainerd & Reyna, 1990). Research suggests that some forms of gist extraction require several hours, and even sleep for further processing (Ellenbogen et al., 2007; Payne et al., 2009), perhaps becoming subsequently reactivated in the hippocampus (Marshall & Born, 2007). Interestingly, the hippocampus may itself be functionally specialized for gist extraction in its anterior segment (Poppenk et al., 2013). The current study investigated the role of the anterior/posterior hippocampus and sleep stages in predicting patterns of change in gist memory over the course of a week. To assess this link, I identified four types of gist (inferential, statistical, multi-item, and single-item) that were described in recent reviews (Landmann et al., 2014; Stickgold & Walker, 2013). 104 participants were recruited, 67 of whom passed eligibility criteria and completed three behavioural sessions (evening before sleep, 12 hours later in the morning after sleep, and one week after the first session) and an MRI several weeks later as part of a broader battery of tasks. I found evidence that inferential gist in a transitive inference task increased over time, suggesting that new information is being formed. I also found that REM, rather than slow-wave sleep, predicted gist extraction in a number of different tasks. Lastly, hippocampal volumes predicted immediate rather than delayed gist extraction.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectsleepen_US
dc.subjectmemoryen_US
dc.subjectgist extractionen_US
dc.subjectmemory reorganizationen_US
dc.titleSleep Contributions to Hippocampal Gist Extractionen_US
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US


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