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dc.contributor.authorLeach, Emilyen
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-05T19:18:38Z
dc.date.available2019-03-05T19:18:38Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/26025
dc.description.abstractWhile previous scholarship concerning Shakespeare comics has considered their pedagogical function as teaching tools to make Shakespeare more accessible or their role in preserving Shakespeare’s place within the popular culture, this dissertation argues that there is much to be gained by looking at Shakespeare comics through the lens of performance studies. This dissertation considers Shakespeare comics as “players in ongoing relationships” and examines the behavior of the adaptors, illustrators, and readers of Shakespeare comics as analogous to that of actors and audience members. In doing so, it illustrates the various ways in which Shakespeare comics engage both creatively and critically with the playwright’s work. It presents the Manga Shakespeare Romeo and Juliet as an example of a Shakespeare comic which offers an extensive character study that challenges its audience to question conventional readings of the playwright’s protagonists. It then considers the Manga Shakespeare Twelfth Night as an example of a Shakespeare comic which incorporates the reader into the narrative in a way that uses the play as an entry point into a broader commentary upon the social structure which the reader inhabits. And finally, it presents the issue of Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman series entitled A Midsummer Night’s Dream and the Kill Shakespeare series by Antony Del Col and Conor McCreery as examples of Shakespeare comics which speak to the place of the playwright and his dramatic works within the modern world and use the comic form to comment upon the exercise of adapting these works into new media. Through an examination of these works, this dissertation situates Shakespeare comics within four distinct but related traditions: the literary tradition to which Shakespeare belongs, the tradition of adaptation of Shakespeare’s dramatic works, the comics tradition, and the performance tradition.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectShakespeareen
dc.subjectComicsen
dc.titlePage or Stage: Reading Shakespeare Comics as Performanceen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreePhDen
dc.contributor.supervisorStraznicky, Martaen
dc.contributor.departmentEnglish Language and Literatureen
dc.embargo.termsI have reached out to all of the publishers of the works from which I have included illustrations in order to seek permissions. However, while most have granted me the requested permissions, two of these have still not responded after several months, and I would like the chance to keep trying before my dissertation goes public.en
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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