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dc.contributor.authorStrong, Johanna
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-02T21:54:43Z
dc.date.available2019-05-02T21:54:43Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/26165
dc.description.abstractIn 1558, Scottish Reformer John Knox published The First Blast of the Trumpet Against the Monstruous Regiment of Women, to which English-Catholic aristocrat Henry Howard responded in 1590 with his as-of-yet-still-unpublished manuscript “A Dutifull Defence of the Lawfull Regiment of Women”. Though Knox and Howard respond to the same phenomenon – the role of women in the traditionally-male authority of the English throne – they held oppositional views of English queenship. Their vastly differing historical contexts transcended their works and resulted in their conflicting arguments. Knox’s opposition to female rule, rooted in his Presbyterianism, denied regal and spiritual authority to queens regnant because he refused to recognise the legitimacy of a woman in political and religious power. Howard, meanwhile, negotiated for mercy from Elizabeth I and hoped for tolerance from her for his Catholicism. He also legitimised female rule because, as a Catholic, Howard did not recognise the English monarch’s supremacy over the Church of England. He thus negated Knox’s concerns about female spiritual authority. Through analysis of the arguments in Knox’s The First Blast and Howard’s “A Dutifull Defence”, contextualisation of both works in early modern Catholic and Protestant resistance theories, and analysis specifically of the environment in which Howard wrote, I argue that Knox and Howard have opposing viewpoints on female monarchy not because of their opinions on sex but because of their religious beliefs. Though Knox and Howard wrote on the subject of female rule in early modern England, both are implicitly influenced by their environments which transcended their present moments and deeply affected how they each responded to queens occupying England’s regal space.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectEarly Modern Englanden_US
dc.subjectReligionen_US
dc.subjectFemale Monarchyen_US
dc.subjectEnglish Catholicismen_US
dc.subjectEnglish Protestantismen_US
dc.subjectJohn Knoxen_US
dc.subjectHenry Howarden_US
dc.titleJohn Knox and Henry Howard: An Understanding of Early Modern Queens Regnanten_US
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
dc.contributor.supervisorCollins, Jeffrey
dc.contributor.departmentHistoryen_US
dc.embargo.termsI would like to restrict my thesis because I will be continuing in a similar field of research for my PhD and would like the information in my MA thesis to be restricted until the completion of my PhD research.en_US
dc.embargo.liftdate2024-04-28T17:55:44Z


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