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dc.contributor.authorJakobek, Julianne
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-03T20:23:10Z
dc.date.available2019-05-03T20:23:10Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/26174
dc.description.abstractLoneliness is understood as the perceived unmet desire for human attachment. In recent years, there has been a growing concern surrounding loneliness that has prompted many to consider ways to remedy the issue. Presently, there have been many developments in technology wherein there is a focus on creating human-like characteristics. Known as anthropomorphic technologies, their increasing capability of providing human-like functions, allow them to be suited to alleviate the issue of loneliness. This is a qualitative content analysis that considers whether or not these technologies are successful through various case studies. The case studies focus on social robots, dating sims, and virtual reality, and were chosen based on the likelihood of being able to replicate human attachment. Due to the nature of this study, there are several ethical and social implications surrounding the idea of the non-human that arise.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectanthropomorphicen_US
dc.subjectlonelinessen_US
dc.subjecttechnologyen_US
dc.subjectanthropomorphic technologiesen_US
dc.subjectnon-humanen_US
dc.subjectrobotsen_US
dc.subjectvirtual realityen_US
dc.subjectdating simsen_US
dc.titleYou Are Never Lonely With A Robot: A Qualitative Content Analysis on the Use of Anthropomorphic Technologiesen_US
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
dc.contributor.supervisorMurakami-Wood, David
dc.contributor.departmentSociologyen_US


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