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dc.contributor.authorNelms, Matthew
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-26T20:10:02Z
dc.date.available2019-06-26T20:10:02Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/26334
dc.description.abstractCardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of non-communicable disease and pre-mature death worldwide. Waist circumference (WC) is a measure of abdominal adiposity that is strongly related to both CVD and all-cause mortality. However, WC is not routinely measured in clinical practice. Predicting which individuals will develop disease is a fundamental aspect to modern healthcare. To date, there is limited research examining whether adding WC to current risk prediction models will improve how well the model identifies individuals at risk for future disease. Therefore, the purpose of this thesis is to investigate whether the addition of WC improves CVD and all-cause mortality risk prediction compared to current models. We analyzed data from 34,377 men and 9,477 women who completed a baseline examination at the Cooper Clinic (Dallas, TX) during 1977 – 2003 and enrolled in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study (ACLS). Participants were followed until mortality or December 31st, 2003. WC was measured at the level of the umbilicus and other health risk factors including blood pressure, blood lipids, smoking, and diabetes were collected using standardized methods. Our primary finding was that the addition of WC does not improve risk prediction for fatal CVD, non-fatal CVD and all-cause mortality. This observation remained consistent across several statistical strategies to assess model performance. However, WC was significantly associated with the outcomes beyond common clinical risk factors. The findings of this thesis demonstrate that although WC is significantly associated with pre-mature death, adding WC to established risk prediction models does not improve how well the model is able to identify which individuals are at increased risk for future disease.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectWaist Circumferenceen_US
dc.subjectCardiovascular Diseaseen_US
dc.subjectAll-Cause Mortalityen_US
dc.subjectRisk Predictionen_US
dc.titleExamining the Influence of Waist Circumference in Cardiovascular Disease Risk Prediction Modelingen_US
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.supervisorRoss, Robert
dc.contributor.departmentKinesiology and Health Studiesen_US
dc.embargo.termsWe wish to restrict the thesis while we prepare the manuscript for submission to a peer-reviewed academic journal.en_US
dc.embargo.liftdate2024-06-26T18:43:40Z


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