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dc.contributor.authorDorland, Alexisen
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-18T21:00:01Z
dc.date.available2019-11-18T21:00:01Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/27453
dc.description.abstractObjective: The primary goal of this study was to determine if a relationship existed between how often a person perceives public drinking in their neighbourhood and if they discriminate against individuals living with alcohol use disorders. The second study goal was to identify if the prevalence of heavy episodic drinking among drinkers in a country modified this relationship. Methods: Our secondary analysis used publicly available data from the World Value Survey Wave 6, in addition to the Global Status Report on Alcohol and Health 2014 provided by the World Health Organization. To investigate the relationships of interest, a two-level multivariate hierarchal logistic regression model with random intercept was created. Prevalence of heavy episodic drinking among drinkers in a country was categorized into quartiles of approximately equal size. Several sensitivity analyses were used to investigate country-specific relationships and the effects of missing data. Results: While the prevalence of heavy episodic drinking among drinkers in a country did modify the relationship, there was no dose response. All of the significant relationships were found within the relative low category of heavy episodic drinking prevalence among drinkers. Additionally, when missing data was accounted for, only one significant relationship remained. When a single level model was created to examine the relationship between perceived frequency of neighbourhood public drinking and discrimination against individuals living with alcohol use disorder within individual countries, unique relationships were found within each country. Conclusion: Although prevalence of heavy episodic drinking among drinkers appeared to be largely unrelated to the main relationship between the perceived frequency of neighbourhood public drinking and discrimination against individuals living with alcohol use disorders, it was clear that the main relationship does exist within certain countries. These results aim to inspire future studies to identify a link between direct contact, second-hand alcohol harms, and how these harmful encounters may motivate discrimination against individuals living with alcohol use disorders within specific cultural contexts.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.rightsAttribution 3.0 United Statesen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/
dc.subjectPublic drinkingen
dc.subjectDiscriminationen
dc.subjectAlcohol Use Disordersen
dc.subjectStigmaen
dc.subjectheavy drinkeren
dc.subjectWorld Value Surveyen
dc.subjectdirect contacten
dc.titleWitnessing Public Drinking and its Relevance to Discrimination Against Individuals Living With Alcohol Use Disordersen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeM.Sc.en
dc.contributor.supervisorStuart, Heatheren
dc.contributor.departmentPublic Health Sciencesen
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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Queen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canada
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Queen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canada