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dc.contributor.authorTrivers, Neilen
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-30T18:56:35Z
dc.date.available2020-03-30T18:56:35Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/27688
dc.description.abstractAdditive manufacturing (AM), specifically the process of Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM), is a manufacturing procedure where a part is constructed by extruding a melted filament in a layer-by-layer fashion from the bottom up. AM processes offer the ability to manufacture more complex features versus traditional subtractive and formative manufacturing methods. Topology optimization is a structural design tool which is known for generating high-stiffness designs having complex and organic features, making it an ideal tool for using with AM technologies. Traditional topology optimization performs well for stiffness design, but stress considerations are often neglected. A significant shortcoming of FDM is the tendency for tensile material properties in build direction to be significantly weaker than the strengths in the other axes. This work presents a methodology for maximizing the safety factor of structural components for fabrication using FDM AM technology by considering the anisotropy of the material strengths using the Tsai-Wu failure criterion. This is achieved through minimizing an aggregated failure index subject to a volume fraction constraint and is implemented into the framework of density-based topology optimization. Multiple numerical test cases are solved to test the behaviour and robustness of the methodology using fictious material properties. For simple test cases, then methodology does not provide competitive designs compared to the traditional stiffness-based topology optimization formulation; however, test cases which exhibit sharp corners and stress concentrations show significant improvements to the safety factor of the designs when compared to the traditional stiffness-based topology optimization formulation. Real-world material properties of plastic FDM are used to show that for the design of an L-shaped bracket, a common shape used in industrial topology optimization problems, the methodology successfully improves the strength of parts when compared to the equivalent stiffness-based topology optimization result.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectTopology Optimizationen
dc.subjectAnisotropic Strengthen
dc.subjectAdditive Manufacturingen
dc.titleAnisotropic Strength-Based Topology Optimization for Part Design Using Additive Manufacturingen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeM.A.Sc.en
dc.contributor.supervisorKim, Il Yong
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical and Materials Engineeringen
dc.embargo.termsThe work completed in this thesis will be submitted to a scientific journal for publication. The thesis should be restricted for five years, or until the work has been published.en
dc.embargo.liftdate2025-03-30T00:31:08Z
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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