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dc.contributor.authorHudson, Chloeen
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-30T22:01:39Z
dc.date.available2020-09-30T22:01:39Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/28169
dc.description.abstractAlthough it is impossible to know the contents of others’ minds with absolute certainty, we can (and do) make probabilistic guesses about what others are thinking or feeling. When these judgments are made based on observable information, we refer to this skill as “theory of mind decoding.” There are individual differences in how accurately adults make theory of mind decoding judgments, and how motivated they are to use this skill in daily life. However, surprisingly little is known social correlates of these individual differences. The current dissertation examined whether theory-of-mind decoding skill, motivation to use this skill, and their interaction predicted three categories of social behaviours: conversational skills, cognitive sensitivity, and mental state language. Further, I explored whether these social behaviours predicted relational success, strangers’ ratings of participant likeability after an initial encounter. Participants were 334 undergraduate students who participated in a cooperative building task with a same-gender stranger. Social behaviours were coded based on video recordings of the building task. Theory-of-mind skill was assessed using the Reading the Mind in the Eyes task, and motivation to use theory of mind was assessed using the self-reported Mind-Reading Motivation scale. Results suggested that theory-of-mind skill, motivation to use this skill, and their interaction did not directly predict partner ratings of participant likeability. However, individual differences in theory of mind did predict partner ratings of participant likeability indirectly through cognitive sensitivity. Further, theory-of-mind skill and motivation to use this skill manifested in different aspects of conversational skills and mental state language, although these behaviours were not significant predictors of partner ratings of participant likeability. Taken together, the results of this study support the general assertion that individual differences in theory of mind are important for social interactions, even among healthy adults, and highlights the basic social cognitive processes that facilitate successful interpersonal interactions.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsQueen's University's Thesis/Dissertation Non-Exclusive License for Deposit to QSpace and Library and Archives Canadaen
dc.rightsProQuest PhD and Master's Theses International Dissemination Agreementen
dc.rightsIntellectual Property Guidelines at Queen's Universityen
dc.rightsCopying and Preserving Your Thesisen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectpsychologyen
dc.subjecttheory of minden
dc.titleBehavioural Manifestations and Relational Correlates of Individual Differences in Theory of Minden
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreePhDen
dc.contributor.supervisorHarkness, Kate
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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