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dc.contributor.authorBenson, Jeannette Elizabeth
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2007-09-28 14:43:16.88en
dc.date.accessioned2007-10-01T17:54:54Z
dc.date.available2007-10-01T17:54:54Z
dc.date.issued2007-10-01T17:54:54Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/743
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Psychology) -- Queen's University, 2007-09-28 14:43:16.88en
dc.description.abstractThis study was conducted to investigate the processes underlying the relation between executive functioning and false belief knowledge. We explored the hypothesis that children with advanced executive functioning skills are better equipped to capitalize on the experiences that are necessary to learn how to reason about others’ mental states. To examine this possibility, we recruited 3.5-year-old children with age-appropriate variability in executive functioning skills to participate in a training study designed to promote their performance on false belief tasks. We found that individual differences in executive functioning task scores strongly and consistently predicted the extent to which children benefited from false-belief training. Importantly, the relation between executive functioning and false belief improvement remained significant after controlling for age, initial performance on mental state reasoning tasks, language skills, and executive functioning improvement across the testing period. Thus, our results support the hypothesis that executive functioning skills influence the extent to which children are able to capitalize on relevant experience to better predict and understand others’ false-belief-based behaviour. This claim is discussed with respect to possible alternative explanations for our findings, and ensuing implications for understanding the interplay between neuromaturational factors and experience.en
dc.format.extent349430 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectCognitive Developmenten
dc.subjectFrontal Lobe Functioningen
dc.subjectTheory of Minden
dc.subjectExecutive Functioningen
dc.subjectTraining Studyen
dc.subjectPreschool-Aged Childrenen
dc.subjectFalse Beliefen
dc.subjectInhibitionen
dc.titleExecutive Functioning and Theory of Mind Development: A Training Studyen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.degreeMasteren
dc.contributor.supervisorSabbagh, Mark A.en
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen


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