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dc.contributor.authorNeuman, Auden
dc.contributor.otherQueen's University (Kingston, Ont.). Theses (Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.))en
dc.date2012-09-29 21:16:51.694en
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-04T18:14:48Z
dc.date.available2012-10-04T18:14:48Z
dc.date.issued2012-10-04
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/7575
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Gender Studies) -- Queen's University, 2012-09-29 21:16:51.694en
dc.description.abstractThis project engages theories of settler colonialism, biopower, and the state of exception to analyze the operations of rights-based narratives of citizenship in relation to political dissent in Canada. I argue that a normalized state of exception founds the white supremacist, settler colonial state, bringing Canadian citizenship into being as a (white) racialized, (cis)gendered, and (hetero)sexualized construct. By examining “resistance narratives” about the Toronto G20 that emerged in the post-G20 climate, my work argues that, in treating the policing practices employed during the G20 as exceptional and in (re)producing the exaltation of white heterosexual cis-masculine citizens, these narratives normalize and reinforce the daily operations of the exception, which targets Indigenous, racialized, and other “Others” in Canada. Finally, my work critically engages with the space of the Eastern Detention Centre (EDC) as a temporary camp set up to detain G20 arrestees, and with the narrative of “Torontonamo” that emerged to describe and explain the EDC. Reading the EDC in the context of other spatial organizations of the exception in Canada, I argue that the “Torontonamo” narrative reasserts race thinking in relation to the normalized operations of the exception. In so doing, it (re)produces white citizen-subjects as the proper recipients of national and international human rights, while abandoning racialized populations to the space of the camp. Ultimately, my work writes against the hegemonic view of the Toronto G20 as an exceptional event in Canadian history. I contend that G20 policing practices were only a hyper-visible example of the normalized operations of the exception within settler colonialism.en_US
dc.languageenen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectAnti-racismen_US
dc.subjectFeminismen_US
dc.subjectResistance movementsen_US
dc.subjectTrans studiesen_US
dc.subjectAnarchismen_US
dc.subjectWhitenessen_US
dc.subjectSettler-colonialismen_US
dc.subjectMedia representationen_US
dc.subjectG20en_US
dc.subjectBiopoweren_US
dc.subjectState of exceptionen_US
dc.subjectCitizenshipen_US
dc.subjectCampen_US
dc.subjectTorontonamoen_US
dc.subjectNationalismen_US
dc.subjectCanadaen_US
dc.subjectGender studiesen_US
dc.titleWounded Subjects: White Settler Nationals in Toronto G20 Resistance Narrativesen_US
dc.typethesisen_US
dc.description.degreeMasteren
dc.contributor.supervisorMorgensen, Scott Lauriaen
dc.contributor.departmentGender Studiesen


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