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dc.contributor.authorWeech, Seamasen
dc.date2013-08-01 17:32:44.772
dc.date2013-08-08 19:06:06.84
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-13T23:36:02Z
dc.date.issued2013-08-13
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1974/8157
dc.descriptionThesis (Master, Psychology) -- Queen's University, 2013-08-08 19:06:06.84en
dc.description.abstractOrthographically-projected biological motion point-light displays generally contain no information about their in-depth orientation, yet observers consistently prefer the facing-the-viewer (FTV) interpretation (Vanrie, Dekeyser and Verfaillie, 2004). This bias has been attributed to the social relevance of such stimuli (Brooks et al., 2008) although local stimulus properties appear to influence the bias (Schouten, Troje and Verfaillie, 2011). In the present study we investigated the cause of the FTV bias. In Experiment 1 we compared FTV bias for various configurations of stick-figures and depth ambiguous human silhouettes. The FTV bias was not present for silhouettes, but was strongly elicited for most stick-figures. We concluded that local attitude assignments for intrinsic structures of stick-figures are subject to inferences about the flexion of body surfaces, and that a visual bias that assumes surfaces to be convex drives the FTV bias. In Experiment 2 we manipulated silhouettes to permit local attitude assignments by using point-lights on emphasized flexion points. As predicted, the inclusion of intrinsic structures produced FTV bias for silhouettes. The results help to unify various findings regarding the FTV bias. We conclude that the FTV bias emerges during the 2 ½-D sketch stage of visual processing (Marr and Nishihara, 1978).en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCanadian thesesen
dc.rightsThis publication is made available by the authority of the copyright owner solely for the purpose of private study and research and may not be copied or reproduced except as permitted by the copyright laws without written authority from the copyright owner.en
dc.subjectConvexity biasen
dc.subjectFacing-the-viewer biasen
dc.subjectVisual perceptionen
dc.subjectBiological motionen
dc.titleThe Facing-the-Viewer Bias in the Perception of Depth Ambiguous Human Figuresen
dc.typethesisen
dc.description.restricted-thesisI am restricting this thesis so that I can work on publishing the data in an article that I am preparing currently along with my thesis supervisor, Dr. Nikolaus Troje. Once my article has been published in a journal, I would be happy for the thesis restriction to be lifted.en
dc.description.degreeM.Sc.en
dc.contributor.supervisorTroje, Nikolaus F.en
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen
dc.embargo.terms1825en
dc.embargo.liftdate2018-08-12
dc.degree.grantorQueen's University at Kingstonen


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